= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

1923 / March | View All Issues |

March 1923

Fiction

409-429 PDF

The happy isles·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A novel–part I (chaps. [I]-VI)


Poetry

439 PDF

For you·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

440-448 PDF

The lordly sun·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

449-459 PDF

Island wild folk·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Collection

460 PDF

Three sonnets·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

460 PDF

But what will they remember·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

460 PDF

A man besmitten so·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

460 PDF

The mountains stoop to hills·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

461-473 PDF

Romance·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

474-480 PDF

The reporter speaks for publication·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

481-488 PDF

The price of reflection·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

489-499 PDF

Liquor control in Sweden·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

500-505 PDF

The avalanche·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

505 PDF

The test·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

506-515 PDF

Damaged souls. IV·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

John Randolph

Fiction

Frontispiece, 516-524, f524, 525-526 PDF

As the law directs·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

526 PDF

A dewdrop·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

527-529 PDF

Suppressed careers·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

529 PDF

The coming race·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

530-533 PDF

Earthquakes and rugs·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

533-534 PDF

Closed doors·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s easy chair

535-538 PDF

Editor’s easy chair·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s easy chair

535-538 PDF

Editor’s easy chair·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

539-543 PDF

Sandy MacPherson, book collector·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

539-544 PDF

Editor’s drawer·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

543 PDF

Superfluous praise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

543 PDF

A careless tailor·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

544 PDF

Early high cost of living note·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

544 PDF

Looking on the bright side·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

544 PDF

A new patronymic·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s drawer

544 PDF

Uncrowded occupations·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

545 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

545-547 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

547 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

547 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

547 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

547-548 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

THE CURRENT ISSUE

March 2017

City of Gilt

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Tyranny of the Minority

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Texas is the Future

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Family Values

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Itchy Nose

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Black Like Who?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Texas is the Future·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Illustration (detail) by John Ritter
Post
The Forty-Fifth President·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph (detail) by Philip Montgomery
Article
Itchy Nose·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Artwork (detail) © The Kazuto Tatsuta/Kodansha Ltd
Article
A Matter of Life·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph (detail) by Edwin Tse
Article
Black Like Who?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph © Jon Lowenstein/NOOR

Hours during which Rio de Janeiro drivers may legally run red lights in order to avoid being carjacked:

10 P.M.–5 A.M.

Antioxidants in dark green, leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale, and collard greens were said to prevent cataracts.

Greece evacuated 72,000 people from the town of Thessaloniki while an undetonated World War II–era bomb was excavated from beneath a gas station.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Who Goes Nazi?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

Subscribe Today