= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

1930 / February | View All Issues |

February 1930

illustration

Frontispiece PDF

The passing of the “Lion”·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.


Article

281-291 PDF

The dear old Constitution·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

291 PDF

Ice storm in spring·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

292-296 PDF

The new skirt length·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

297-305 PDF

The eight-dollar pup·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

306-313 PDF

A burglar looks at laws and codes·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

313 PDF

A wild thing·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

314-321 PDF

On the practice of smoking in church·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Poetry

321 PDF

Black and white·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

322-332 PDF

Rat pie·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Among the black midwives of the South

Article

333-342 PDF

If Ramsay MacDonald were an American·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

343-351 PDF

Office hours·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

352-366 PDF

The religion of a scientist·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

367-373 PDF

Infantile paralysis·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

374-381 PDF

The loves of orchids·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

382-384 PDF

A plea for three-party marriages·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

384-386 PDF

The good old city air·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The lion’s mouth

387-388 PDF

Curing insomnia·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s easy chair

389-392 PDF

Riches, news, and cures·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Editor’s easy chair

389-392 PDF

Editor’s easy chair·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

393-394 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

394-395 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

395 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

395-396 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

396 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

396 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Personal and otherwise

Frontispiece, 394 PDF

Personal and otherwise·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Get access to 164 years of
Harper’s for only $34.99

United States Canada

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2014

50,000 Life Coaches Can’t Be Wrong

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Quinoa Quarrel

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

You Had to Be There

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Study in Sherlock

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Post
“1. Death, The Sound of Perseverance (Nuclear Blast, 1998)”
Photograph (detail) by Peter Beste
Article
You Had to Be There·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“He explained how sober Doug structured the bits and worked out the material’s logic; drunk Doug found the funny.”
Illustration by Andrew Zbihlyj
[Letter from Bentonville]
Citizen Walmart·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

From the July 2012 issue

“He’s taking on a heap of debt to scale up for Walmart, a heap of debt.”
Photograph by Thomas Allen
Article
Dark Heights·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Discussed in this essay:

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, by Elizabeth Kolbert. Henry Holt. 352 pages. $28.

The extinction symbol is a spare graphic that began to appear on London walls and sidewalks a couple of years ago. It has since become popular enough as an emblem of protest that people display it at environmental rallies. Others tattoo it on their arms. The symbol consists of two triangles inscribed within a circle, like so:

“The triangles represent an hourglass; the circle represents Earth; the symbol as a whole represents, according to a popular Twitter feed devoted to its dissemination (@extinctsymbol, 19.2K followers), “the rapidly accelerating collapse of global biodiversity” — what scientists refer to alternately as the Holocene extinction, the Anthropocene extinction, and (with somewhat more circumspection) the sixth mass extinction.

Article
Consume, Screw, Kill·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“Now may be the unlikeliest time for us to grow a conscience about how our rapacity is endangering other species, since we’re now aware of how frightfully our rapacity is endangering us.”
Collage (detail) by David McLimans

Ratio of husbands who say they fell in love with their spouse at first sight to wives who say this:

2:1

Mathematicians announced the discovery of the perfect method of cutting a cake.

Indian prime-ministerial contender Narendra Modi, who advertises his bachelorhood as a mark of his incorruptibility, confessed to having a wife.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST