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1943 / August | View All Issues |

August 1943

Personal and otherwise

4, 6, 8, 10 PDF

[various]·

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Personal and otherwise

10, 15 PDF

Eugene F. Saxton·

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The new books

25-28 PDF

The new books·

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Article

193-200 PDF

The split in our foreign policy·

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Fiction

201-205 PDF

It’s pretty big·

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Collection

201-212 PDF

East by southwest: stories of the Pacific·

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Fiction

206-212 PDF

The captain sleeps·

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Poetry

221 PDF

Finish·

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Article

222-226 PDF

If we invade the Balkans·

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The easy chair

236-239 PDF

The easy chair·

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Article

240-245 PDF

Don’t waste the game crop!·

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Article

246-253 PDF

[Americans in battle–no. 6·

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] the knockout at Midway

Article

254-259 PDF

Hiding under the enemy’s nose·

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Article

259 PDF

Provincialism is good·

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Article

260-266 PDF

The people at war·

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V. New industries make new men

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267-274 PDF

Murmansk, 1943·

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How it looked to a merchant seaman

Article

275-280 PDF

Quinine–reborn in our hemisphere·

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Article

281-288 PDF

Why not try freedom?·

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[Coming in Harper’s]

4 PDF

[Coming in Harper's]·

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In a city that is rapidly pricing out the poor, NYCHA’s housing projects are a last bastion of affordable shelter, with an average monthly rent of $509
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Ratio of the amount of water used to make the containers to the amount of bottled water consumed:

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Police in Pforzheim, Germany, detained an owl who was drunk on schnapps.

In the United States, legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act was advanced by the House Ways and Means Committee after 18 hours of deliberation, during which time the Republican members of Congress passed around candy.

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