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1965 / April | View All Issues |

April 1965

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Untitled·

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Letters

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[Coming in Harper’s]

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Coming in Harper’s·

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The editor’s easy chair

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The Shah and his exasperating subjects·

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A report from Iran (part II)

After hours

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Getting out from under an image·

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After hours

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Antidote to nonsense·

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Broadcasting and the news·

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[part I]

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Edith Sitwell . . . poet·

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Collection

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Six English self-portraits·

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Victor Gollancz . . . publisher·

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Henry Moore . . . sculptor·

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Albert Finney . . . actor·

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Cecil Beaton . . . photographer, designer·

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Article

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Evelyn Waugh . . . novelist·

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Article

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The new Soviet oligarchy·

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Article

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A good time at UCLA·

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An English view

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How to complicate a trip·

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Trials of a word-watcher·

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There were pigeons in the square·

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Washington insight

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The new books

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Exploring the province of the short story·

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Thing of darkness·

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Books in brief

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Music in the round

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Jazz notes

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The South today . . . 100 years after Appomattox·

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Foreword·

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From the first Reconstruction to the second·

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This quiet dust·

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Their own negro·

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Georgia boy goes home·

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Poetry

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Black bourgeoisie·

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A conservative prophecy·

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Peace below, tumult above

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What it took·

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Voices from the South·

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The fallen paradise

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Their own language

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From protest to politics·

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(1) To need his glasses and be struck by an awareness that they are not at hand, an ordinary enough circumstance for Frederick Douglass, except sometimes it’s accompanied by a flash of extraordinary dread. If not quite panic, certainly an unease disproportionate to a simple recurring situation. Dread that may be immediately extinguished if he locates his horn-rimmed, owlish-eyed spectacles exactly where he anticipated they should be. He sees them and almost sighs. Nearly feels their slightly uncomfortable weight palpable on his nose. Finding the glasses enough to reassure him that he remains here among the living in this material …
Photograph (detail) © Andrew Quilty/Oculi/Redux
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(1) To need his glasses and be struck by an awareness that they are not at hand, an ordinary enough circumstance for Frederick Douglass, except sometimes it’s accompanied by a flash of extraordinary dread. If not quite panic, certainly an unease disproportionate to a simple recurring situation. Dread that may be immediately extinguished if he locates his horn-rimmed, owlish-eyed spectacles exactly where he anticipated they should be. He sees them and almost sighs. Nearly feels their slightly uncomfortable weight palpable on his nose. Finding the glasses enough to reassure him that he remains here among the living in this material …
Photograph (detail) of miniatures by Lori DeBacker by Thomas Allen
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(1) To need his glasses and be struck by an awareness that they are not at hand, an ordinary enough circumstance for Frederick Douglass, except sometimes it’s accompanied by a flash of extraordinary dread. If not quite panic, certainly an unease disproportionate to a simple recurring situation. Dread that may be immediately extinguished if he locates his horn-rimmed, owlish-eyed spectacles exactly where he anticipated they should be. He sees them and almost sighs. Nearly feels their slightly uncomfortable weight palpable on his nose. Finding the glasses enough to reassure him that he remains here among the living in this material …
Illustration (detail) by Nate Kitch
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(1) To need his glasses and be struck by an awareness that they are not at hand, an ordinary enough circumstance for Frederick Douglass, except sometimes it’s accompanied by a flash of extraordinary dread. If not quite panic, certainly an unease disproportionate to a simple recurring situation. Dread that may be immediately extinguished if he locates his horn-rimmed, owlish-eyed spectacles exactly where he anticipated they should be. He sees them and almost sighs. Nearly feels their slightly uncomfortable weight palpable on his nose. Finding the glasses enough to reassure him that he remains here among the living in this material …
Illustration (detail) by Matthew Richardson

Chances that a Soviet woman’s first pregnancy will end in abortion:

9 in 10

Peaceful fungus-farming ants are sometimes protected against nomadic raider ants by sedentary invader ants.

In San Antonio, a 150-pound pet tortoise knocked over a lamp, igniting a mattress fire that spread to a neighbor’s home.

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"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

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