= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

1987 / May | View All Issues |

May 1987

illustration

Front cover PDF

The board room·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.


Letters

4-7, 74-76 PDF

Letters·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Letters

4-7 PDF

The last stop·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Notebook

8, 10-11 PDF

Fade to black·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Harper’s Index

13 PDF

Harper’s index·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Readings

15-34 PDF

[Article]

Nuclear power’s Faustian bargain·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

Campbell’s primordial soup·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

Nuclear times·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Cartoon]

Readings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

Pissing contests·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[illustration]

Help us keep Malaysia drug free·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[illustration]

Death for drug traffickers under Malaysian law·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Collection]

[untitled]·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

The CIA sizes up the Mexican domino·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[charts]

Supreme queries·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

The artist and AIDS·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Photography]

Drawing on the land·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Poetry]

Homer’s “Iliad,” updated·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Review]

Useful Zulu phrases·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[illustration]

El cocodrilo·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[illustration]

Mujeres en armes·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Collection]

Guatemala’s updated icons·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Fiction]

I know what I’m doing·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Poetry]

Give me a nickname, prison·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Fiction]

Not-so-silent sea·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Photography]

Susan and Blaze, San Francisco (1986)·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Fiction]

The making of the president·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Photography]

Readings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Photography]

Readings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Collection]

The Rocky Mountain Maoist·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Article]

Never mind·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

[Cartoon]

Readings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

Front cover, 35-39, 42-45 PDF

The next panic. Fear and trembling on Wall Street·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Fiction

60-64 PDF

Snares·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

66-69 PDF

Cultivating virtue. Compost and its moral imperatives·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Article

70-72 PDF

Perils of policy. The Marshall Plan only worked once·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Double acrostic

77 PDF

No. 53·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Puzzle

80 PDF

May tricks·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

THE CURRENT ISSUE

March 2017

Tyranny of the Minority

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Texas is the Future

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Family Values

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Itchy Nose

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Black Like Who?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Matter of Life

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Texas is the Future·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Illustration (detail) by John Ritter
Post
The Forty-Fifth President·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph (detail) by Philip Montgomery
Article
Itchy Nose·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Artwork (detail) © The Kazuto Tatsuta/Kodansha Ltd
Article
A Matter of Life·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph (detail) by Edwin Tse
Article
Black Like Who?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

I first heard the name Barack Obama in the spring of 2004, while visiting my mother in Chicago. As we sat around the kitchen table early one spring morning, I noticed a handsome studio portrait among the pictures, lists, cards, and other totems of family life fastened to the refrigerator door. “Who’s the guy with the ears?” I asked, assuming he was some distant relative or family friend I didn’t know or else had forgotten. “Barack Obama,” she answered with a broad smile. “He’s running for Senate, but he’s going to be the first black president.”

Photograph © Jon Lowenstein/NOOR

Amount Miller Brewing spends each year to promote its Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund:

$300,000

In Zambia an elephant fought off fourteen lionesses, in South Africa a porcupine fought off thirteen lionesses and four lions, in Maine voters chose to continue baiting bears with doughnuts, and in the Yukon drunken Bohemian waxwings were detained in modified hamster cages.

It was reported that education secretary Betsy DeVos’s brother, the founder of a private military company whose employees were convicted of killing 17 unarmed civilians in Baghdad in 2007, would be providing China with military training.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Who Goes Nazi?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

Subscribe Today