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1990/ September

September 1990

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1990/ September

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This was already evident during the early German counter-Enlightenment. When Herder called for his countrymen to spit out the slime of the Seine, German breasts swelled with pride. In the work of Herder’s successor, the poet Ernst Moritz Arndt, the rejection of French universalism begins to sound like a martial drumbeat: “Let this hatred [of the French] smolder as the religion of the German folk, as a holy mantra in all hearts, and let it preserve us in our fidelity, our honesty and courage.” In Heinrich von Treitschke, writing under Bismarck’s Second Reich, in the 1870s, we discern a further …
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This was already evident during the early German counter-Enlightenment. When Herder called for his countrymen to spit out the slime of the Seine, German breasts swelled with pride. In the work of Herder’s successor, the poet Ernst Moritz Arndt, the rejection of French universalism begins to sound like a martial drumbeat: “Let this hatred [of the French] smolder as the religion of the German folk, as a holy mantra in all hearts, and let it preserve us in our fidelity, our honesty and courage.” In Heinrich von Treitschke, writing under Bismarck’s Second Reich, in the 1870s, we discern a further …
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This was already evident during the early German counter-Enlightenment. When Herder called for his countrymen to spit out the slime of the Seine, German breasts swelled with pride. In the work of Herder’s successor, the poet Ernst Moritz Arndt, the rejection of French universalism begins to sound like a martial drumbeat: “Let this hatred [of the French] smolder as the religion of the German folk, as a holy mantra in all hearts, and let it preserve us in our fidelity, our honesty and courage.” In Heinrich von Treitschke, writing under Bismarck’s Second Reich, in the 1870s, we discern a further …
Photograph (detail) of miniatures by Lori DeBacker by Thomas Allen
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This was already evident during the early German counter-Enlightenment. When Herder called for his countrymen to spit out the slime of the Seine, German breasts swelled with pride. In the work of Herder’s successor, the poet Ernst Moritz Arndt, the rejection of French universalism begins to sound like a martial drumbeat: “Let this hatred [of the French] smolder as the religion of the German folk, as a holy mantra in all hearts, and let it preserve us in our fidelity, our honesty and courage.” In Heinrich von Treitschke, writing under Bismarck’s Second Reich, in the 1870s, we discern a further …
Illustration (detail) by Nate Kitch

Chances that a Soviet woman’s first pregnancy will end in abortion:

9 in 10

Peaceful fungus-farming ants are sometimes protected against nomadic raider ants by sedentary invader ants.

In San Antonio, a 150-pound pet tortoise knocked over a lamp, igniting a mattress fire that spread to a neighbor’s home.

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"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

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