Weekly Review — November 25, 2003, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

President George W. Bush traveled to Great Britain, along with 650 companions, including five personal chefs, but was unable to move freely in the country because of massive protests. At Buckingham Palace the president dined on roasted halibut with herbs, free-range chicken, potatoes cocotte, salad, and a sorbet bombe but presumably skipped the Puligny-Montrachet and the Veuve Clicquot, Gold Label, 1995. Truck bombs blew up the British Consulate and a British bank in Istanbul, killing at least 27 and wounding hundreds. Bloody victims ran screaming through the streets. Two hotels in Baghdad used by Westerners were bombed as was the headquarters of a pro-American Kurdish group in Kirkuk.New York Times, Daily TelegraphIraqi guerrillas were using homemade rocket launchers pulled by donkeys and concealed by piles of hay.New York TimesThe Pentagon was planning to launch a 24-hour satellite television channel based in Baghdad to make it easier to circumvent the news media “filter” that Bush Administration officials believe is misleading the public by emphasizing bad news about the occupation of Iraq.Washington PostPresident Bush was asked to comment on the contradiction between “all [his] talk of freedom, justice and tolerance” and the treatment of the prisoners at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. “Justice is being done,” he replied. “These are illegal noncombatants.”New York TimesRichard Perle, a Pentagon adviser and one of the architects of the conquest of Iraq, admitted to an audience in London that the invasion was illegal: “I think in this case international law stood in the way of doing the right thing.”GuardianCounterterrorism officials said that all the recent Al Qaeda attacks were a sign that the organization has been weakened.New York TimesA rocket hit a hotel in Kabul, Afghanistan.Associated PressAn animal-rights group fed ham to 70,000 sheep that were destined to be eaten in the Middle East.Agence France-PresseL. Paul Bremer, the American proconsul of Iraq, said that Saddam Hussein is “a voice in the wilderness.”New York TimesLondon banned the feeding of pigeons in Trafalgar Square.Reuters

Judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Manhattan heard arguments over the indefinite detention of Jose Padilla, an American citizen who was arrested in Chicago last year and declared an “enemy combatant.” A government lawyer said that “Al Qaeda made the battlefield the United States”; an opposing lawyer said that “the president seeks an unchecked power to substitute military power for the rule of law“; Judge Rosemary Pooler observed that “as terrible as 9/11 was, it didn’t repeal the Constitution.”New York TimesThe Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that homosexuals have the right to get married.New York TimesThe House of Representatives voted to ban keeping lions, tigers, and other “big cats” as pets.Agence France-PresseMichael Jackson was arrested and booked for being a child molester; he then made bail and went to Las Vegas. His lawyer, who also represents Scott Peterson, an accused double murderer, said that the charges are “a big lie.”Fox NewsMexico fired its ambassador to the United Nations for saying that the United States treats his country as a backyard. “We never, ever, in any way would treat Mexico as some backyard or as a second-class nation,” said Colin Powell, the secretary of state. “We have too much of a history that we have gone through together.”New York TimesThe Carnegie Endowment for International Peace released a study concluding that Nafta has failed to create jobs for Mexico and has hurt thousands of rural Mexican farmers. The report also said that the net effect on U.S. jobs had been “minuscule.”New York TimesTen thousand people demonstrated in Miami against a meeting of trade officials who hope to set up a free-trade area among 34 countries in the Western Hemisphere.New York TimesPresident Eduard Shevardnadze of Georgia was forced to resign in the face of massive protests, andNew York TimesMuslims across the Middle East celebrated Jerusalem Day by demonstrating and chanting, “Death to Bush! Death to Sharon!”Associated PressThe Department of Homeland Security was reportedly planning to abandon its program requiring most Arab and Muslim foreign men to register with the government. Sources said the program was expensive, inefficient, and useless.New York TimesThe United Nations war-crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia heard testimony from Miroslav Deronjic, a former Bosnian Serb politician, that Radovan Karadzic gave the order in 1995 to slaughter the Muslim men and boys of Srebrenica: “At one moment, he said the following sentence to me: ‘Mirsolav, all of them need to be killed ?? whatever you can lay your hands on.’”New York Times

Conrad Black, the right-wing Canadian press mogul and British lord, was caught receiving large “unauthorized payments” from his company and announced that he was resigning as CEO and that he will sell his company, Hollinger International, which owns the Chicago Sun-Times, the Daily Telegraph, the Jerusalem Post, and other media properties.New York TimesIt was reported that Arnold Schwarzenegger wore a Prada suit to his inauguration as governor of California; his wife, Maria Shriver, wore a cream skirt and shell by Valentino.New York TimesKrist Novoselic, the former bassist for Nirvana, was thinking about running for lieutenant governor of Washington.New York TimesThe big mutual-fund scandal continued to unfold, andNew York TimesSenate Democrats and moderate Republicans used a fillibuster to block a $30 billion energy bill that would have given immunity from lawsuits to petrochemical companies that have polluted water supplies with MTBE, a carcinogenic fuel additive.ForbesThe Russian Orthodox Church denounced the Mormons for buying the names of dead Russians so they can baptize their dead souls. “Our ceremony is not rebaptism,” said a spokesman for the Nizhni Novgorod Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, “it only gives the soul of the deceased person the freedom of choice to accept our belief or to reject it.”GuardianA German cannibal named Armin Meiwes said he was sorry for killing and eating another man, who supposedly agreed to be eaten and shared a meal of his own penis with his killer. Prosecutors have charged Meiwes with “murder for sexual satisfaction,” because cannibalism is not a crime in Germany.BBCThe Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency began preliminary research into the development of a “hypersonic cruise vehicle” that in theory will be able to take off from a normal runway in the United States and within two hours striketargets more than 10,000 miles away.New ScientistAn American warship docked at Ho Chi Minh City.ReutersIsraeli researchers successfully used DNA to create a functional self-assembling electronic nano-device.New ScientistBritain’s Royal College of Surgeons said that face transplants, though technically possible, probably should not be performed.New ScientistGiant pouched rats were being used to sniff out land mines in Mozambique.Guardian

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Photograph (detail) by Brian Frank
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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Artwork by Imre Kinszki © Imre Kinszki Estate
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The Lords of Lambeau·

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Photograph (detail) by Balazs Gardi
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"She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. 'Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.'"
Photograph (detail) by Lara Shipley

Price of ten pencils made from “recycled twigs,” from the Nature Company:

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A loggerhead turtle in a Kobe aquarium at last achieved swimming success with her twenty-seventh set of prosthetic fins. “When her children hatch,” said the aquarium’s director, “well, I just feel that would make all the trauma in her life worthwhile.”

In Colombia, U.N. delegates sent to serve as impartial observers of the peace process aimed at ending the half-century-long war between the FARC and the Colombian government were chastised after they were filmed dancing and getting drunk with FARC fighters at a New Year’s Eve party.

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