No Comment — August 26, 2007, 12:35 am

A YouTube Dullard

I am a big fan of YouTube, and would, in fact reckon it the major internet advancement of the last two years. No blog has made more effective use of it than Andrew Sullivan’s The Daily Dish, which is, in fact, my favorite blog outside of Harper’s. While Andrew is off being hitched (congrats to him and Aaron Tone), a quartet of guest bloggers are holding the fort at the Dish: three I know and like almost as much as Andrew and a newcomer named James Kirchick, who I understand is Marty Peretz’s assistant over at The New Republic. Most of today’s posts are from Kirchick, and I can’t say I’m impressed by them.

The worst of the set is an attack on Max Blumenthal for his recent series of short videos in which Max visits Religious Right and conservative youth conferences. The short films became very hot items on the web and demonstrated an effective use of the medium. Blumenthal has been doing some good work in this area, and his pieces on the internal goings-on at the Washington Times and the Religious Right’s onslaught against the Air Force Academy are important.

According to Kirchick, all Max Blumenthal is doing is

crashing crazy right-wing events and making the participants look dumb. It’s not so hard to do, and this type of gotcha “journalism” is lazy and cuts both ways.

In fact Blumenthal doesn’t do anything to “make the participants look dumb,” they do that all by themselves. He does a very good job of showing the vigorous efforts underway to control the meeting’s message to the media, and how deceptive that message is. But Kirchick then strains to try to make Blumenthal look dumb. It doesn’t work—instead it’s Kirchick who comes across as a dullard.

Reading to the end I get the distinct sense that, for Kirchick, Max Blumenthal’s great offense is being the son of Sidney Blumenthal. That’s revealing.

This post is far below the standards of the Dish and Kirchick needs to grow up and stop abusing Andrew’s website.

One other thing really sticks in my mind. Max Blumenthal has been out there busily defending The New Republic from the onslaughts of Bill Kristol and the Weekly Standard over the last two weeks. It looks like Kirchick is giving him repayment in kind. Remind me please: which of these publications is Kirchick actually working for? I think we just found out.

Share
Single Page

More from Scott Horton:

Context, No Comment August 28, 2015, 12:16 pm

Beltway Secrecy

In five easy lessons

From the April 2015 issue

Company Men

Torture, treachery, and the CIA

Six Questions October 18, 2014, 8:00 pm

The APA Grapples with Its Torture Demons: Six Questions for Nathaniel Raymond

Nathaniel Raymond on CIA interrogation techniques.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

March 2016

Bird in a Cage

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Hidden Rivers of Brooklyn

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Save Our Public Universities

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Rogue Agency

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mad Magazines

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Killer Bunny in the Sky

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Save Our Public Universities·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“Whether and how we educate people is still a direct reflection of the degree of freedom we expect them to have, or want them to have.”
Photograph (crop) by Thomas Allen
Article
New Movies·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Force Awakens criticizes American imperialism while also celebrating the revolutionary spirit that founded this country. When the movie needs to bridge the two points of view, it shifts to aerial combat, a default setting that mirrors the war on terror all too well.”
Still © Lucasfilm
Article
Isn’t It Romantic?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“He had paid for much of her schooling, something he cannot help but mention, since the aftermath of any failed relationship brings an ungenerous and impossible impulse to claw back one’s misspent resources.”
Illustration by Shonagh Rae
Article
The Trouble with Iowa·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“It seems to defy reason that this anachronistic farm state — a demographic outlier, with no major cities and just 3 million people, nine out of ten of them white — should play such an outsized role in American politics.”
Photograph (detail) © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Article
Rule, Britannica·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“This is the strange magic of an arrangement of all the world’s knowledge in alphabetical order: any search for anything passes through things that have nothing in common with it but an initial letter.”
Artwork by Brian Dettmer. Courtesy the artist and P.P.O.W., New York City.

Number of people who attended the World Grits Festival, held in St. George, South Carolina, last spring:

60,000

The brown bears of Greece continued chewing through telephone poles.

In Peru, a 51-year-old activist became the first former sex worker to run for the national legislature. “I’m going to put order,” she said, “in that big brothel which is Congress.”

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Two Christmas Mornings of the Great War

By

Civilization masks us with a screen, from ourselves and from one another, with thin depth of unreality. We habitually live — do we not? — in a world self-created, half established, of false values arbitrarily upheld, largely inspired by misconception, misapprehension, wrong perspective, and defective proportion, misapplication.

Subscribe Today