Weekly Review — December 4, 2007, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

[Image: A Tempest, December 1878]

More than 80 French police officers were injured in clashes with youths firing shotguns in the Paris banlieues.77 Police Officers Hurt in Paris RiotsSarkozy flies back to tackle ‘urban warfare’ in ParisVoters in Venezuela narrowly defeated a referendum on changing their constitution to abolish presidential term limits and vastly increase President Hugo Chavez’s executive powers.Venezuela Votes on Whether to Give Chávez More PowerVenezuela Hands Narrow Defeat to Chávez PlanPresident Pervez Musharraf quit his role as chief of Pakistan’s army.Emotional Musharraf quits as Pakistan army chiefSenator Hillary Clinton praised her campaign staff for “their extraordinary courage and coolness under some very difficult pressures and dangerous situations,” after a man wearing a fake bomb made from road flares took several Clinton staffers hostage in New Hampshire. The hostage-taker, Leeland Eisenberg, had seen an ad spot in which a New Hampshire man said Clinton had helped him get health insurance. “He kept expressing he wanted to get help,” Eisenberg’s stepson explained. “He wasn’t able to get it because he didn’t have insurance, he didn’t have money.”Hostage Situation at Clinton Office in N.H.Family Calls Hostage-Taking an ‘Act of Desperation’The Department of Homeland Security was asking firefighters to look for signs of suspicious activity while putting out fires,Dept of Homeland Security wants Firefighters to look for terrorists while in the line of dutyand Pentagon officials announced that 5,000 U.S. troops would withdraw from Iraq next month.U.S. to reduce Iraq troop levels by 5,000Farmers in Afghanistan were growing fewer poppies and more pot,Afghans turn from growing poppies to potand the child stars of the movie “The Kite Runner” were sent from Kabul to a luxury hotel in the United Arab Emirates after threats were made to their safety. “The best possible outcome,” said a consultant to Paramount, “would be in 20 years to see a ‘Where Are They Now’ piece on VH1.”??Kite Runner?? Boys Are Sent to United Arab EmiratesKhaled Hosseini, the author of the novel on which the film is based and a resident of California, implored the United States not to abandon Afghanistan. Without U.S. support, he wrote, “Afghanistan is doomed.”‘Kite Runner’ author urges US to hang on in Afghanistan

In Khartoum, thousands of Sudanese protesters armed with clubs and knives called for the execution of Gillian Gibbons, a British teacher convicted of insulting Islam after she permitted her students to name their class teddy bear “Muhammad”; Gibbons, pardoned by the president of Sudan, was released from jail and fled to England.Thousands in Sudan Call for British Teddy Bear Teacher’s ExecutionA San Diego man was arrested for attempting to purchase black-bear gallbladders,Arrest in bear parts sting and fears of a bear market forced Bear Stearns to lay off 4 percent of its staff.Bear Stearns Announces New Round of Job CutsNorth of the Arctic Circle, the remote and entirely lightless town of Narvik, Norway, was further depressed by its loss of a $64 million investment in the American subprime-mortgage market. U.S. Credit Crisis Adds to Gloom in NorwayFears about the American economy had reportedly slowed sales of recreational vehicles, with the exception of the “biggest, baddest” models, which get seven miles to the gallon, cost up to $1.7 million, and include such amenities as Italian marble floors and a lock with an electronic palm reader.Housing Crisis? Try Mobile McMansionsA 3.3 pound truffle sold for $330,000 at an auction held simultaneously in Macau, London, and Florence. The winning bidder, Macau casino owner Stanley Ho, outbid the British artist Damien Hirst and Sheikh Bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi.Giant truffle sets record priceFood banks across the United States, facing critical shortages, were forced to distribute emergency rations intended for disaster relief,U.S. food banks, in a squeeze, tighten beltsand researchers reported that sophisticated neurological scans reveal anorexic brains to show high levels of activity in the caudate, the region of the brain concerned with outcome and planning.Anorexia visible with brain scans

In Angola, an outbreak of acute neurological syndrome was attributed to high levels of sodium bromide, an industrial chemical, in kitchen salt. Bromide Believed Behind Cacuaco Epidemic A physician and amateur historian from Palo Alto contended that Abraham Lincoln suffered from the rare genetic disease MEN 2B, which he believes was responsible for Lincoln’s great height, lumpy lips, and the early deaths of three of his four sons.Is Lincoln Earliest Recorded Case of Rare Disease?Evel Knievel died,Evel Knievel Dies at 69Rodney King bicycled home after being shot in the face,Rodney King Wounded in Shootingand Susan Bateman, a martial-arts instructor in Virginia, was arrested for kicking an 11-year-old student in the gut more than 200 times as the class counted. Bateman issued a challenge during class to see how many kicks her students could sustain; the boy suffered internal injuries and a broken rib.Martial arts teacher arrested for kicking student 200 timesRome’s traffic and parking chief was fired after he parked his red Alfa Romeo in a no-parking zone and displayed a handicapped permit belonging to an 86-year-old woman.Parking chief fired for illegal parkingA Chilean prostitute auctioned 27 hours of sex to raise money for a disabled children’s charity, saying that she wanted “to contribute with my work to a purpose that touches me deeply,”Prostitute auctions 27 hours of sex for charityand serial flasher Michael Carney of Fleetham Grove, England, pleaded unsuccessfully that because his penis was “so much smaller than average,” he could not have committed his crimes.Flasher’s ‘inadequacy’ plea failsAstronomers discovered a one-billion-light-year-wide pocket full of nothing in the sky.The Ice-Cream Scoop Taken Out of the Universe

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Photograph (detail) by Brian Frank
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A Window To The World·

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Artwork by Imre Kinszki © Imre Kinszki Estate
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The Lords of Lambeau·

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Photograph (detail) by Balazs Gardi
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"She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. 'Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.'"
Photograph (detail) by Lara Shipley

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