No Comment — February 16, 2008, 8:27 am

Lorca’s Barren Orange Tree

Leñador.
Córtame la sombra.
Líbrame del suplicio
de verme sin toronjas.

¿Por qué nací entre espejos?
El día me da vueltas.
Y la noche me copia
en todas sus estrellas.

Quiero vivir sin verme.
Y hormigas y vilanos,
soñaré que son mis
hojas y mis pájaros.

Leñador.
Córtame la sombra.
Líbrame del suplicio
de verme sin toronjas.


Woodsman,
Cut loose my shadow,
Free me from this ordeal
Of seeing myself without fruit.

Why was I born among the mirrors?
Day revolves around me
And night copies me
In all its stars.

I want to live without seeing myself.
I will dream that
Ants and hawks
Are my leaves and birds.

Woodsman,
Cut loose my shadow
Free me from this ordeal
Of seeing myself without fruit.

Federico García Lorca, Canción del naranjo seco (a Carmen Morales) (1921) first published in Canciones (1924)(S.H. transl.)

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