Washington Babylon — February 8, 2008, 10:16 am

The Meaning of Mitt’s Tears

Mitt Romney reportedly teared up during his withdrawal speech yesterday but so far the pundits aren’t analyzing his moist eyes. Did he really get choked up? Was it merely a ploy to build sympathy for his likely presidential run in 2012? Alas, that sort of penetrating insight is reserved only for tears shed by Hillary Clinton.

Nor have there been strenuous objections about Romney’s lamentable remarks, revolting even by his own low standards, in which he essentially accused Clinton and Barack Obama of being in league with Osama bin Laden. “If I fight on in my campaign, all the way to the convention, I would forestall the launch of a national campaign and make it more likely that Senator Clinton or Obama would win,” Mitt said. “And in this time of war, I simply cannot let my campaign be a part of aiding a surrender to terror.”

Yes, as Jon Stewart noted last night, if Mitt were to keep on campaigning–the terrorists would win.

Romney didn’t drop out for the perceived good of the country; he bailed because his campaign has been a fiasco. Despite the construction of an impressive political machine and the expenditure of vast sums of money, including tens of millions of dollars of his own fortune, Mitt couldn’t win a single important state.

And why was that? Well, as another Daily Show segment last night put it, Romney is a douche. Beyond that, he was surely hurt by the Mormon issue (especially in the South) and by the fact that he’s an inveterate flip-flopper with no core values, and hence most voters just didn’t trust him.

Come 2012, there’s a good chance that Romney will be back for another shot at the presidency. Given his inherent political liabilities, a second bid is likely to end in crushing defeat as well.

Share
Single Page

More from Ken Silverstein:

Commentary November 17, 2015, 6:41 pm

Shaky Foundations

The Clintons’ so-called charitable enterprise has served as a vehicle to launder money and to enrich family friends.

From the November 2013 issue

Dirty South

The foul legacy of Louisiana oil

Perspective October 23, 2013, 8:00 am

On Brining and Dining

How pro-oil Louisiana politicians have shaped American environmental policy

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2016

Fighting Chance

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Front Runner

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Habits of Highly Cynical People

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Unhackable

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

American Imperium

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Post
Elisabeth Zerofsky on Marine Le Pen, Paul Wachter on the quest for an unhackable email, Rebecca Solnit on cynical people, Andrew J. Bacevich on truth and fiction in the age of war, Samuel James photographs E.P.L. soccer, a story by Vince Passaro, and more

The old woman’s husband, even older than she, has lived long enough. She is careful not to say this to her daughters, to her brother, to the doctors. He’s had a stroke, or something like a stroke, and at first he seemed to be recovering. Then there were intermittent bad days and setbacks and now, a few weeks in, they are all bad days: he is declining, delirious, difficult, and she is exhausted. Her mind — usually a badger den of plans, desires, and, most of all, worry — now, at night, in its rare moments of rest, tumbles into a pale white silence. She doesn’t want him to live on like this, biting the nurses like a dog that needs to be put down.

Illustration by Taylor Callery
Article
Front Runner·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"The F.N. asked to be sent to an institution whose legitimacy it did not accept, and French voters rewarded the party with first place in the election."
Illustration (detail) by Matthew Richardson
Article
American Imperium·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"One consequence of remaining perpetually at war is that the political landscape in America does not include a peace party."
Illustration (detail) by Steven Dana
Article
War of The Roses·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Guns never had a political agenda. They were first and foremost about themselves and their music."
Photograph (detail) by Marc Canter
Article
A Shrinking World, An Opening Sky·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Her mind — usually a badger den of plans, desires, and, most of all, worry — now, at night, in its rare moments of rest, tumbles into a pale white silence."
The No Mind Not Thinks No Things vokgret (detail), by Doug and Mike Starn. Courtesy the artists and Galerie Lelong, New York City

Average number of times a Canadian apologizes each week:

4

Beaumont, Texas, produces the saddest tweets.

The Finnish postal service announced it will begin mowing lawns on Tuesdays.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Mississippi Drift

By

Matt was happy enough to sustain himself on the detritus of a world he saw as careening toward self-destruction, and equally happy to scam a government he despised. 'I’m glad everyone’s so wasteful,' he told me. 'It supports my lifestyle.'

Subscribe Today