No Comment, Quotation — September 27, 2008, 7:25 am

Bruno on Cultivating the Heaven Within

michelangelo-daniel

Disponiamoci, dico, prima nel cielo che intellettualmente
è dentro di noi, e poi in questo sensibile che corporalmente
si presenta a gli occhi. Togliemo via dal cielo de l’animo
nostro l’Orsa della difformità, la Saetta de la detrazione,
l’Equicolo de la leggerezza, il Cane de la murmurazione,
la Canicola de l’adulazione. Bandiscasi da noi l’Ercole
de la violenza, la Lira de la congiurazione. . .
Se cossí, o dei, purgaremo la nostra abitazione, se cossí
renderemo novo il nostro cielo, nove saranno le costellazioni ed influssi, nove l’impressioni, nove fortune; perché
da questo mondo superiore pende il tutto, e contrarii
effetti sono dependenti da cause contrarie. O felici, o veramente fortunati noi, se farremo buona colonia del nostro
animo e pensiero! A chi de voi non piace il presente stato,
piaccia il presente conseglio. Se vogliamo mutar stato,
cangiamo costumi. Se vogliamo che quello sia buono e
megliore, questi non sieno simili o peggiori. Purghiamo
l’interiore affetto, atteso che da l’informazione di questo
mondo interno non sarà difficile di far progresso alla riformazione di questo sensibile ed esterno.

Let us restore to order the heaven that lies within us intellectually, and then that visible heaven that presents itself bodily to your eyes. Let us distance from the heaven of our mind the bear of roughness, the arrow of envy, the foal of levity, the dog of evil calumny, the bitch of flattery; let us banish the Hercules of violence, the lyre of complacency… When we have in this way made for ourselves a new home and restored our heaven, then, too, shall reign new constellations, new influences and powers and new destinies. All depends upon this higher world, and out of its contradictory causes flow necessarily contradictory effects. Oh we happy ones, we truly blissful ones, know that our happiness depends upon the proper cultivation of our minds and thoughts. If we wish to improve our condition, we must change our customs; if we want the former to become good and better, the latter must not be allowed to worsen. If we purify the drive within us, then it will not be hard to pass from this transformation in the inner world to the reformation of the sensible and external world.

Giordano Bruno, La spaccio della bestia trionfante (1584) in Le opere italiane (P. de Lagarde ed. 1888), p. 412 (S.H. transl.)

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