Washington Babylon — October 30, 2008, 2:58 pm

More Mystery on Senator Coleman and His Donor Friend

A lawsuit filed in Texas earlier this week and now apparently withdrawn alleges that one of Senator Norm Coleman’s campaign donors, Nasser Kazeminy, aided the senator by hiring a firm where his wife worked. The lawsuit was filed against Kazeminy by Paul McKim, the CEO of Deep Marine Technologies

The Nation reported on the siuation and got a copy of the lawsuit, which says:

In March 2007, Kazeminy began ordering the payment of corporate funds to companies and individuals who tendered no goods or services to DMT for the states purpose of trying to financially assist United States Senator Norm Coleman of Minnesota. In March 2007, Kazeminy telephoned B.J. Thomas, then DMT’s Chief Financial Officer. In that conversation, Kazeminy told Mr. Thomas that “US Senators don’t make [expletive deleted]” and that he was going to find a way to get money to Coleman and wanted to utilize DMT in the process…Kazeminy told Mr. McKim that he [Kazeminy] would make sure there was paperwork to make it appear as though the payments were made in connection with the legitimate transations, explaining further that Senator Coleman’s wife, Laurie, worked for the Hays Companies, an insurance broker in Minneapolis, and that the payments could be made to Hays for insurance.

McKim’s attorney, Casey Wallace, declined comment.

Weird.

Update: Here’s the lawsuit, from the Minnesota Independent.

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