No Comment — February 2, 2009, 11:56 pm

More on the Renditions Hoopla

Tonight on Rachel Maddow, on MSNBC, I discussed the whisper campaign to mischaracterize President Obama’s decision to stand down the Bush 43 extraordinary renditions program, while leaving open the possibility of renditions as practiced in the Bush 41 and Clinton presidencies.

I cited the Eichmann case as the prototype of an appropriate rendition. Renditions may well be criminal under the law of the state in which the person was captured, though some states permit a defense against a kidnapping charge for persons seizing someone to be brought to justice (such as bounty hunters). However, they would not generally be illegal under U.S. law, and there is settled precedent on this point. This helps explain why Obama will not rule out renditions altogether, though contrary to the view expressed in the Los Angeles Times article, I doubt his administration will turn to this device as frequently as his predecessor has. When deciding to use rendition, the government has to measure a number of considerations, including whether the person apprehended really presents a threat to the safety and security of the country sufficient to warrant the damage to diplomatic relations that may well result from the rendition. Extraordinary renditions are something entirely apart. They are a criminal act of a very high order both under U.S. law and international law, and no circumstances could justify them.

There have been a flurry of posts on this subject in the blogosphere. The best are by Hilzoy at the Washington Monthly, Glenn Greenwald at Salon, and Andrew Sullivan at The Atlantic. The most confused appear at Hot Air and Instapundit, neither of which displays an inkling of the distinction between “extraordinary renditions” and “renditions.”

Two other posts help unpack the issue. Richard Clarke addresses the confusion over renditions in an explanatory piece in the Boston Globe. He patiently walks the reader through the prior use of renditions, reviews how Bush 43 modified the program by enlisting the CIA to run long-term detention facilities and put torture at its core. Not surprisingly, Clarke has a very precise understanding of what Obama changed and what he left intact.

House Judiciary Chair John Conyers also discusses renditions in the course of a piece at the Huffington Post, talking about the need for accountability. Conyers mentions a little reported fact: the CIA’s inspector general undertook a probe into the extraordinary renditions program. His probe was shut down by Vice President Cheney, and we still don’t know what he found or recommended, other than that CIA Director Hayden was mortified by it. All the indicators are that the CIA’s inspector general found that the extraordinary renditions program was unlawful and he demanded accounting for it. If that was his conclusion, then he took a view shared by virtually the entire legal profession in the United States. Obviously it is time to shed some sanitizing sunlight on what was done. Freeing up the inspector general to finish his review and render a final report would be an obvious next step. Indeed, concern about just such a probe may be driving some of the CIA sources to instigate the current whisper campaign.

Share
Single Page

More from Scott Horton:

Context, No Comment August 28, 2015, 12:16 pm

Beltway Secrecy

In five easy lessons

From the April 2015 issue

Company Men

Torture, treachery, and the CIA

Six Questions October 18, 2014, 8:00 pm

The APA Grapples with Its Torture Demons: Six Questions for Nathaniel Raymond

Nathaniel Raymond on CIA interrogation techniques.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

March 2016

Mad Magazines

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Killer Bunny in the Sky

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Bird in a Cage

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Hidden Rivers of Brooklyn

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Save Our Public Universities

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Rogue Agency

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Save Our Public Universities·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“Whether and how we educate people is still a direct reflection of the degree of freedom we expect them to have, or want them to have.”
Photograph (crop) by Thomas Allen
Article
New Movies·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Force Awakens criticizes American imperialism while also celebrating the revolutionary spirit that founded this country. When the movie needs to bridge the two points of view, it shifts to aerial combat, a default setting that mirrors the war on terror all too well.”
Still © Lucasfilm
Article
Isn’t It Romantic?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“He had paid for much of her schooling, something he cannot help but mention, since the aftermath of any failed relationship brings an ungenerous and impossible impulse to claw back one’s misspent resources.”
Illustration by Shonagh Rae
Article
The Trouble with Iowa·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“It seems to defy reason that this anachronistic farm state — a demographic outlier, with no major cities and just 3 million people, nine out of ten of them white — should play such an outsized role in American politics.”
Photograph (detail) © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Article
Rule, Britannica·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“This is the strange magic of an arrangement of all the world’s knowledge in alphabetical order: any search for anything passes through things that have nothing in common with it but an initial letter.”
Artwork by Brian Dettmer. Courtesy the artist and P.P.O.W., New York City.

Number of people who attended the World Grits Festival, held in St. George, South Carolina, last spring:

60,000

The brown bears of Greece continued chewing through telephone poles.

In Peru, a 51-year-old activist became the first former sex worker to run for the national legislature. “I’m going to put order,” she said, “in that big brothel which is Congress.”

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Two Christmas Mornings of the Great War

By

Civilization masks us with a screen, from ourselves and from one another, with thin depth of unreality. We habitually live — do we not? — in a world self-created, half established, of false values arbitrarily upheld, largely inspired by misconception, misapprehension, wrong perspective, and defective proportion, misapplication.

Subscribe Today