Washington Babylon — March 11, 2009, 8:25 am

Senator Vitter Turns Tail

From Roll Call, via TalkingPointsMemo:

Among Members of Congress, there’s a long-standing, proud tradition of the Airport Freakout. Add to the list of those who’ve indulged in meltdowns and temper tantrums while traveling one Sen. David Vitter, who on Thursday joined what we’ve dubbed the “Mile-Low Club” by going ballistic on an airline worker after missing a flight from Washington’s Dulles airport to New Orleans.

Vitter, best known for hiring a prostitute and forcing his wife to accompany him to a press conference where he expressed remorse, apparently arrived late for the flight and pushed through a locked gate, thereby setting off a security alarm:

Vitter, our spy said, gave the airline worker an earful, employing the time worn “do-you-know-who-I-am” tirade that apparently grew quite heated. That led to some back and forth, and the worker announced to the irritable Vitter that he was going to summon security…But after talking a huffy big game, Vitter apparently thought better of pushing the confrontation any further. When the gate attendant left to find a security guard, Vitter turned tail and simply fled the scene.

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