No Comment — July 8, 2009, 7:36 pm

Public Event: Justice After Guantánamo

As a newly inaugurated president, Barack Obama renounced U.S. torture and promised to close Guantánamo. But is this enough to repair the damage wrought by the Bush administration? Does the country need to hold the responsible parties legally and morally accountable?

Michael Walzer moderates a panel featuring David Bromwich, Scott Horton, and Joseph Saunders on the question of how to seek justice in the wake of American-sanctioned torture–and how to prevent it from happening again.

The panel is on Thursday, July 9 at 7 p.m. at BookCourt (163 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201). The event is free and open to the public, so please feel free to forward this invite to friends and colleagues.

Michael Walzer is co-editor of Dissent and Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale University, a Dissent editorial board member, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books.

Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor of Harper’s where he writes the “No Comment” blog and an adjunct professor at Columbia Law School. He wrote the “Justice After Bush” cover story for the magazine’s December issue.

Joseph Saunders is deputy program director at Human Rights Watch, responsible for overseeing the organization’s work in Asia, Latin America, and the United States, and its thematic work in the areas of terrorism and counterterrorism, business and human rights, and LGBT rights.

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