Washington Babylon — August 31, 2009, 10:12 am

You Read It Here First: Obama is not God

From the Washington Post:

[T]he criticism of Barack Obama has turned strikingly personal as some of his liberal media allies have gone wobbly on him. After playing a cheerleading role during the campaign, some are bluntly questioning whether he’s up to the job.

If Obama is losing Paul Krugman, can the rest of the left be far behind? “I’m concerned as to whether, in trying to reach out to the middle, he is selling out his base,” says Chicago Tribune columnist Clarence Page. “I find myself saying, ‘Where’s that well-oiled Obama machine we saw last year?’ . . . Maybe he’s being a little too cool at this point.”

David Corn, a blogger for Politics Daily, says that despite a reservoir of support for the president, some of his policies “have caused concern, if not outright anger, among certain liberal commentators and bloggers. It’s been a more conventional White House than many people expected or desired. . . . He’s made compromises that have some people concerned about his adherence to principle.”

Oh my god, Obama is making compromises on his principles? What a shock.

Here’s what I wrote about Obama in the fall of 2006, nearly three years ago:

[It is] startling to see how quickly Obama’s senatorship has been woven into the web of institutionalized influence-trading that afflicts official Washington. He quickly established a political machine funded and run by a standard Beltway group of lobbyists, P.R. consultants, and hangers-on. For the staff post of policy director he hired Karen Kornbluh, a senior aide to Robert Rubin when the latter, as head of the Treasury Department under Bill Clinton, was a chief advocate for NAFTA and other free-trade policies that decimated the nation’s manufacturing sector (and the organized labor wing of the Democratic Party). Obama’s top contributors are corporate law and lobbying firms (Kirkland & Ellis and Skadden, Arps, where four attorneys are fund-raisers for Obama as well as donors), Wall Street financial houses (Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase), and big Chicago interests (Henry Crown and Company, an investment firm that has stakes in industries ranging from telecommunications to defense)…

The question, though, is…how effective—let alone reformist—Obama’s approach can be in a Washington grown hostile to reform and those who advocate it. After a quarter century when the Democratic Party to which he belongs has moved steadily to the right, and the political system in general has become thoroughly dominated by the corporate perspective, the first requirement of electoral success is now the ability to raise staggering sums of money. For Barack Obama, this means that mounting a successful career, especially one that may include a run for the presidency, cannot even be attempted without the kind of compromising and horse trading that may, in fact, render him impotent.

When the piece came out, Obama’s office issued a press release criticizing it and said I displayed too much cynicism about the American political system and politicians. Clearly, I wasn’t cynical enough.

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More from Ken Silverstein:

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