No Comment, Quotation — November 29, 2009, 7:35 am

Wang Wei’s Farewell

kao_ko-kung_001

wang-wei-farewell

Dismounting, I offer my friend a cup of wine,
I ask what place he is headed to.
He says he has not achieved his aims,
Is retiring to the southern hills.
Now go, and ask me nothing more,
White clouds will drift on for all time.

Wang Wei (??), The Farewell (ca. 750 CE)

This poem, one of the best known works of the Tang dynasty poet and civil servant Wang Wei, is selected as a tribute to Phil Carter, who has just stepped down from the most thankless posting in the administration–as deputy assistant secretary for detainee affairs in the Department of Defense. He acquitted himself admirably in that position, demonstrating something that few government servants can–the ability to listen patiently and attentively to those who have differing views, always showing a spirit of good will and a desire to understand, combining the ethos of the citizen soldier and the public servant in an almost effortless way. As in the case of Wang Wei’s departing friend, he is a devoted servant of the state now moving on to “achieve other aims.”

Wang Wei was simultaneously an accomplished painter, and many of his poems appear linked to paintings, only a few of which survive (usually as copies). It’s possible that this poem is intended to accompany a landscape, probably of hills within a cloud bank like the work of Gao Kogong set above the poem.

Listen to Dame Janet Baker sing Gustav Mahler’s setting of Wang Wei’s Farewell from Das Lied von der Erde (1909) in a 1970 performance with Rafael Kubelik and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. The poem can of course be understood in different ways, but by tradition it has been seen as tied to a literal scene of leave-taking. The poet bids farewell and offers a parting drink to his friend, another civil servant or warrior, who is traveling south into retirement. In Mahler’s modification, the poet is puzzled about the reasons for the sudden parting, pressing his friend for an explanation. He replies with a suggestion of dissatisfaction with his life as a civil servant, a want of fulfillment. The poem sounds a note of momento mori, a sense of need to get on with life and to more fully taste its possibilities–being conscious of the limited time available to each of us. But against this the poet sets the image of eternity, shown in white clouds drifting in the hills–a promise of transcendence through artistic vision. Mahler adapts the text heavily to stress this final element of the eternal. The singer repeatedly intones the word “ewig” (“forever”), six paired repetitions, descending in tonality as the reality of the world appears to fade away and a post-temporal space is bid to emerge (in Ernest Bloch’s memorable formulation, “it melts with an unresolved suspension into an immeasurable forever.”) It is one of Mahler’s greatest accomplishments involving orchestra and the human voice, aggressively challenging the sonic possibilities of the voice and orchestra with the underlying themes of the poem.

Share
Single Page

More from Scott Horton:

From the April 2015 issue

Company Men

Torture, treachery, and the CIA

Six Questions October 18, 2014, 8:00 pm

The APA Grapples with Its Torture Demons: Six Questions for Nathaniel Raymond

Nathaniel Raymond on CIA interrogation techniques.

No Comment, Six Questions June 4, 2014, 8:00 am

Uncovering the Cover Ups: Death Camp in Delta

Mark Denbeaux on the NCIS cover-up of three “suicides” at Guantánamo Bay Detention Camp

Get access to 164 years of
Harper’s for only $39.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

April 2015

The Joke

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Abolish High School

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Beat Reporter

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Going It Alone

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Rotten Ice

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Life After Guantánamo

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

[Browsings]
Photograph by the author
Article
Rotten Ice·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“When I asked if we were going to die, he smiled and said, ‘Imaqa.’ Maybe.”
Photograph © Kari Medig
Article
Life After Guantánamo·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“I’ve seen the hell and I’m still in the beginning of my life.”
Illustration by Caroline Gamon
Article
Going It Alone·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“The call to solitude is universal. It requires no cloister walls and no administrative bureaucracy, only the commitment to sit down and still ourselves to our particular aloneness.”
Photograph by Richard Misrach
Article
No Slant to the Sun·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“She didn’t speak the language, beyond “¿cuánto?” and “demasiado,” but that didn’t stop her. She wanted things. She wanted life, new experiences, a change in the routine.”
Photograph © Stuart Franklin/Magnum Photos

Acreage of a Christian nudist colony under development in Florida:

240

Florida’s wildlife officials decided to remove the manatee, which has a mild taste that readily adapts to recipes for beef, from the state’s endangered-species list.

A 64-year-old mother and her 44-year-old son were arrested for running a gang that stole more than $100,000 worth of toothbrushes from Publix, Walmart, Walgreens, and CVS stores in Florida.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Driving Mr. Albert

By

He could be one of a million beach-bound, black-socked Florida retirees, not the man who, by some odd happenstance of life, possesses the brain of Albert Einstein — literally cut it out of the dead scientist's head.

Subscribe Today