Links — December 7, 2009, 5:48 pm

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From “The War We Can’t Win,” in the November 2009 Harper’s Magazine

History deals rudely with the pretensions of those who presume to determine its course. In an American context, this describes the fate of those falling prey to the Wilsonian Conceit. Yet the damage done by that conceit outlives its perpetrators.

From time to time, in some moment of peril or anxiety, a statesman appears on the scene promising to eliminate tyranny, ensure the triumph of liberty, and achieve permanent peace. For a moment, the statesman achieves the status of prophet, one who in his own person seemingly embodies the essence of the American purpose. Then reality intrudes, exposing the promises as costly fantasies. The prophet’s followers abandon him. Mocked and reviled, he is eventually banished—perhaps to some gated community in Dallas.

However brief his ascendancy, the discredited prophet leaves behind a legacy. Most obvious are the problems created and left unresolved, commitments made and left unfulfilled, debts accrued and left unpaid. Less obvious, but for that reason more important, are the changes in perception. The prophet recasts our image of reality. Long after his departure, remnants of that image linger and retain their capacity to beguile: consider how the Wilsonian vision of the United States as crusader state called upon to redeem the world in World War I has periodically resurfaced despite Woodrow Wilson’s own manifest failure to make good on that expectation. The prophet declaims and departs. Yet traces of his testimony, however at odds with the facts, remain lodged in our consciousness.

Read the rest of “The War We Can’t Win” for free…

1923-06-00151

Related: Alex Pareene’s The Encyclopedia of Counterintuitive Thought (“Amateurs are better than experts”; “Ann Coulter should be a feminist icon”; “boys are the biggest victims of sex discrimination.”)
Roosevelt (Theodore Roosevelt) to blame (sort of) for Pearl Harbor;
Russian archaeologists haunted (“Next morning, one of the archaeologists went to the woods and got lost. He came back three hours later, with his clothes dirty and insane look on his face. He never told his friends what happened to him.”);
7,000 years of German cannibalism: from yesterday through today;
NPR covering up for Bernanke

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