Weekly Review — January 5, 2010, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

[Image: A Christian martyr, 1855]
A Christian martyr.

As the Obama Administration failed to meet a self-imposed deadline for diplomatic progress with Iran, foreign minister Manouchehr Mottaki demanded that the United Nations renegotiate the terms of a nuclear fuel deal by the end of the month lest his country begin producing and enriching its own uranium. An Iranian general announced plans for a “large-scale military exercise” to correspond with the deadline.New York TimesWall Street JournalCNNA group purported to be Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, and headed by two former Guantanamo detainees, claimed responsibility for the attempted bombing of a Northwest Airlines plane bound for Detroit on Christmas Day.BBCThreats from Al Qaeda shut down the U.S. and U.K. embassies in Yemen. General David Petraeus said the United States would in 2010 nearly double the amount of aid to Yemen, where, according to Yemen’s foreign minister, as many as 300 Al Qaeda members currently operate.CNNReutersNew York TimesThe Transportation Security Administration announced that it would add 150 full-body scanners to U.S. airports, and former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff went on television to tout the importance of equipping airports with the scanners, which can see through people’s clothing; the Christmas Day attack was a “vivid lesson in the value of that machinery,” he told CNN, without revealing that he is paid by the machine’s manufacturers.Christian Science MonitorWashington Post

Suicide bombers killed seven people at a CIA base in Afghanistan, 88 people at a volleyball tournament in Pakistan, and 25 people in Iraq’s Anbar province.Washington PostMexico announced that 7,600 people died last year in the country’s “war” on the drug cartels,New York TimesLos Angeles TimesCNNChina executed a British man for smuggling 8.8 pounds of heroin into the country, CNNIsraeli courts moved to desegregate a major road into the West Bank,Jerusalem Postand Ireland enacted a law banning blasphemy.CNNMalaysia’s high court ruled that Catholics in the country should be allowed to refer to “God” as “Allah,”Wall Street Journaland the Turkish government was considering asking Italy to return the bones of Santa Claus, stolen by Italian sailors in the eleventh century. BBCThe British government’s Department for Business, Innovation, and Skills recommended that parents show their adult children who live at home “tough love” by refusing to do their washing and ironing. BBCRussia set a minimum price for vodka,Rianand in a poll Hillary Clinton narrowly beat out Sarah Palin as the most admired woman of the year. Christian Science MonitorItalian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi announced that “Thank God that Silvio exists” would no longer be the anthem of his People of Freedom Party.Christian Science MonitorIn Malawi, two men were arrested for getting engaged,BBCand in Argentina, Alejandro Freyre and Jose Maria Di Bello became the continent’s first gay married couple.BBCNew Hampshire legalized same-sex marriage,Reutersand the Senate confirmed its first openly gay U.S. marshal. Los Angeles Times

New Yorkers celebrated the third annual Good Riddance Day by shredding letters, photos, and other documents in Times Square,BBCand President Obama signed an executive order declaring that “no information may remain classified indefinitely.”New York TimesScientists reported that less damage was caused by nature in 2009 than in 2008, and that only 10,000 people were killed by natural disasters in 2009 compared with 75,000 the year before.BBCAn earthquake in Tajikistan left 20,000 people homeless.CNNWildfires and floods ravaged parts of Australia.BBCA New Year’s Day mudslide at a resort in Brazil killed at least 26 people, and at least 60 died in mudslides across the southeast of the country. BBCAvalanches in the Scottish mountains of Ben Nevis killed three climbers,BBCand the oldest survivor of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Jeanette Trapani, died at the age of 107.San Francisco ChronicleA hiker in Snowdonia in Wales was airlifted to safety after he attempted to slide down the mountain because it seemed “easier than walking.”BBCA team of scientists discovered a “lava tube” on the moon that could support a lunar colony by offering protection against the harsh conditions on the surface,CNNand Russia announced plans to divert the asteroid Apophis, which has a one in 250,000 chance of striking Earth in 2036. “We should pay several hundred million dollars and build a system that would allow us to prevent a collision,” said Anatoly Perminov, head of Russia’s federal space program. “People’s lives are at stake.” BBC

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

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 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

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Photograph (detail) by Brian Frank
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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Artwork by Imre Kinszki © Imre Kinszki Estate
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The Lords of Lambeau·

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Ashley arrived for her prenatal appointment at Black Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology, in Rapid City, South Dakota, wearing a black zip-up hoodie and Converse sneakers.1 To explain her absence from work that morning — a Tuesday in April 2015 — she had told a co-worker that she was having “female issues.” She was twenty-five years old and eight weeks pregnant. She had been separated from her husband, with whom she had a five-year-old son, for the better part of a year. The guy who’d gotten her pregnant was someone she’d met at the gym, and he’d made it abundantly clear that he wanted nothing more to do with her. Ashley found herself hoping that the doctor would discover some kind of fetal defect, so that her decision would be easier. She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. “Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.”

In the exam room, she perched on the table with her feet crossed at the ankles, her blond hair brushing the back of her pink hospital gown. “I don’t know what’s available for me here,” she told her doctor, Katherine Degen, who sat facing her on a stool. “I figured nothing.”

 Some names and identifying details have been changed. 

“Big, fat zero, unfortunately,” Degen said, making a 0 with her fingers. The last doctor who provided abortions in Rapid City retired in 1986, three years before Ashley was born.

The baby was due in November, when Ashley, who was a nurse, hoped to be enrolled in a graduate program to become a nurse practitioner. Getting pregnant as a teenager had forced her to put that dream on hold, but she had thought that she was finally ready; she had even submitted her application shortly before the March 15 deadline. For the first time in her adult life, Ashley felt as if her plans were coming together. Then she missed her period.

It would be too difficult to attend school as a single mother of two, Ashley knew. She had made an appointment for three weeks from now at the nearest abortion clinic, in Billings, Montana, 318 miles away. But just a week and a half ago, her husband had said he wanted to get back together and offered to raise the child as his own. Was it a sign that she was meant to continue the pregnancy? As a rule, Ashley approached her problems with resolve. She was capable and tough; she liked shooting guns and lifting weights. She kept track of her stats and checked off her goals as she achieved them one by one. Yet the dilemma before her had shaken her confidence. She leaned back and turned to watch the ultrasound screen. The black-and-white image danced. A sharp, fast thumping emerged from the machine. As Degen removed the wand, Ashley wiped the corner of her eye.

Photograph (detail) by Balazs Gardi
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"She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. 'Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.'"
Photograph (detail) by Lara Shipley

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