Washington Babylon — June 16, 2010, 11:00 am

Arizona from the Right: A conversation with Senator Ron Gould

Senator Ron Gould bills himself as “the most conservative” politician in the Arizona state legislature, and he has the flat-top haircut to prove it; next to Gould, Sergeant Joe Friday looks like a Yippie. I met Gould earlier this year during a reporting trip to Arizona, for a piece that appears in the July issue of the magazine (not yet available online) on the state’s economic crisis and general political insanity.

As I noted in another item posted today, Arizona is essentially bankrupt. In May, voters approved a ballot measure that temporarily raised the state sales tax, which averted an immediate budget collapse.

I don’t necessarily share Gould’s views on the state’s budget crisis, but I enjoyed his candor and admired his consistency. Below are excerpts from our conversation.

Haven’t taxes been cut too much in Arizona?

I don’t buy the argument that tax cuts created the problem. The problem is overspending. The state collects a sales tax on new houses and commercial construction, and when housing values were going up everyone was borrowing against their house to get a pool, a new SUV and a big screen TV. The high tide came in 2007 but we continued to spend like we were going up the peak.

We need to cut back to 2004 levels of spending. if the program didn’t exist in 2004, there should be no funding for it now. The cuts will be harsh but I don’t see a choice. I told constituents when I ran for office I wouldn’t raise taxes and I intend to honor that pledge.

What do you think of what the legislature has done so far to address the crisis?

Most of what we have done is smoke and mirrors. We’ve played accounting games, securitized state buildings and lottery revenues. It’s like saying, “Daddy, can I have a twenty year advance on my allowance?”

Would the sales tax hike solve the problems? [note: Interview took place before the May vote.]

It won’t solve the problem, it will just postpone the inevitable.

Share
Single Page

More from Ken Silverstein:

From the November 2013 issue

Dirty South

The foul legacy of Louisiana oil

Perspective October 23, 2013, 8:00 am

On Brining and Dining

How pro-oil Louisiana politicians have shaped American environmental policy

Postcard October 16, 2013, 8:00 am

The Most Cajun Place on Earth

A trip to one of the properties at issue in Louisiana’s oil-pollution lawsuits 

Get access to 164 years of
Harper’s for only $34.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2014

50,000 Life Coaches Can’t Be Wrong

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Quinoa Quarrel

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

You Had to Be There

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Study in Sherlock

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Post
“In Thunupa’s footsteps grew a miraculous plant that could withstand drought, cold, and even salt, and still produce a nutritious grain.”
Photograph by Lisa M. Hamilton
Article
A Study in Sherlock·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“It is central to the pleasure of the Sherlock Holmes stories that they invite play, and that they were never meant to be taken seriously.”
Illustration by Frederic Dorr Steele
Post
My Top 5 Metal Albums and Their Poetic Counterparts·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“1. Death, The Sound of Perseverance (Nuclear Blast, 1998)”
Photograph (detail) by Peter Beste
Article
Found Money·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“I have spent my entire adult existence in a recession. Like most people I talk to, I assume the forces that control the market are at best random and at worst rigged. The auction shows only confirm that suspicion.”
Illustration by Steven Dana
Post
The School of Permanent Revolución·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“The University of Venezuela has provided a consistent counterweight to governmental authority, but it has also reliably produced the elite of whatever group replaced the status quo.”
Photograph © Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez

Percentage of non-Christian Americans who say they believe in the resurrection of Christ:

52

A newly translated Coptic text alleged Judas’ kiss to have been necessitated by Jesus’ ability to shape-shift.

Russia reportedly dropped a series of math texts from a list of recommended curricular books because its illustrations featured too many non-Russian characters. “Gnomes, Snow White,” said a Russian education expert, “these are representatives of a foreign-language culture.”

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST