Weekly Review — July 12, 2011, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

[Image: Babylonian lion, 1875]

The “News of the World,” a British tabloid, was shuttered amid a police investigation into allegations its journalists had hacked into the cell phones of as many as 7,000 people, including politicians, celebrities, and murder victims. Two former editors were arrested, owner Rupert Murdoch called the scandal “deplorable,” and a disgruntled staffer told the paperâ??s former editor in chief, Rebekah Brooks, that sheâ??d “toxified” the publication. Crossword clues in the paperâ??s final edition included the terms “Brook,” “stink,” “catastrophe,” “criminal enterprise,” “string of recordings,” “will fear new security measure,” “digital protection,” and “mix in prison.”CNNGuardianAtlanticTelegraph (London)A computer virus attached to a post claiming to show Casey Anthony confessing to her lawyer circulated on Facebook after Anthony was acquitted in Florida of the murder of her two-year-old daughter, Caylee. In letters to a fellow inmate, Anthony told of wanting to shop at Target and have more children upon her release. “Iâ??ve thought about adopting, which even sounds weird to me saying it, but there are so many children that deserve to be loved,” Anthony wrote. “Letâ??s make a deal? Letâ??s get pregnant together?”SnopesCNNFox NewsRepublican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann signed a pledge to defend traditional marriage values, fight pornography, and find a cure for homosexuality, and in Mexico, a woman on a conjugal visit was caught attempting to smuggle her husband out of prison in a wheeled suitcase.Daily BeastBBC

ABC announced that its recently canceled soap operas “All My Children” and “One Life to Live” will continue online; the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that the national unemployment rate had risen to 9.2 percent, its highest level this year; and Interim Superintendent Erroll B. Davis Jr. announced that Atlanta schools would create a “more open, transparent and empowering culture” after educators across the city were found to have been complicit in changing wrong answers on standardized tests.Wall Street JournalWashington PostCNN.comChinese authorities blocked Web searches for the Yangtze River, and a 50-mile-wide haboob blacked out the sky over Phoenix.Wall Street JournalHuffington PostA boat sank off the coast of Sudan, killing some 200 migrants; a riverboat sank on the Volga River in Russia, killing at least 125 people; and in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, one train collided with a bus returning from a wedding party, killing at least 35, while another derailed, killing at least 65. Militants bombed a train in the Indian state of Assam, injuring at least 90, and in Pakistan, nearly 100 Karachi residents were killed in politically and ethnically targeted assassinations.BBCNew York TimesGuardianNew York TimesTelegraph (Calcutta)Washington PostFollowing decades of civil war, the oil-rich region of South Sudan split off from the North to form the worldâ??s newest country. “There is nothing bad in the future,” said Gabriel Yaac, a Southerner, while Mariam al-Mahdi, a spokeswoman for the UMMA party in the North, said, “This overwhelming of sorrow, of sadness is wrapping around us. I cannot put my feelings into words. It is beyond expression. I am in a vacuum. I want to go into hibernation.”Reuters via Globe and Mail

A stolen Slovenian bear cub named Lucky was recovered and sent to a Romanian orphanage, the lineage of polar bears was traced back to a female brown bear who lived 20,000 to 50,000 years ago in Ireland, and a man was killed by a mother grizzly in Yellowstone National Park. The U.S. government said it would stop protecting Wyoming wolves, and rangers at Yosemite National Park cracked down on campsite scalping.BBCWiredNew York TimesNew York TimesNPR.orgPyeongchang, South Korea, won the 2018 Winter Olympics, and the countryâ??s prosecutors indicted 46 soccer players on charges of match-fixing.Washington PostNew York TimesAstronomers analyzed photos of Saturn from NASAâ??s “Cassini” probe, which showed a storm whose surface area was eight times that of Earth, as well as other unique, long-lasting weather patterns. “Cassini,” said one of the scientists, “shows us that Saturn is bipolar.”NASAIn Belarus, a one-armed protester was arrested for clapping. Svetlana Kalinkina, a Belarusian newspaper editor, said the case is not the first of its kind: “There was one case where a deaf and mute person was accused of shouting antigovernmental slogans. Miracles happen in our courts.”Christian Science Monitor

Share
Single Page

More from J Gabriel Boylan:

Weekly Review February 27, 2012, 9:36 pm

Weekly Review

Weekly Review January 3, 2012, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

Weekly Review November 8, 2011, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

Get access to 164 years of
Harper’s for only $39.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

Stop Hillary!

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

How the Islamic State was Won

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Cage Wars

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Everyday Grace

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Stop Hillary!·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"What Hillary will deliver, then, is more of the same. And that shouldn’t surprise us."
Photograph by Joe Raedle
Article
Cage Wars·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"In the 1970s, “Chickens’ Lib” was a handful of women in flower-print dresses holding signs, but in the past decade farm hens have become almost a national preoccupation."
Photograph by Adam Dickerson/Big Dutchman USA, courtesy Vande Bunte Farms
Article
Paradise Lost·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Suffering Sappho! Here we still are, marching right into yet another century with our glass ceilings, unequal pay, unresolved work and child-care balance, and still marrying, forever marrying, men."
Illustration by Anthony Lister
Article
Off the Land·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Nearly half the reservation lives below the poverty line, with unemployment as high as 60 percent, little to no infrastructure, few entitlements, a safety net that never was, no industry to speak of, and a housing crisis that has been dire not for five years but since the reservation’s founding in 1855."
Illustration by Stan Fellows
Post
Introducing the November 2014 Issue·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Doug Henwood on stopping Hillary Clinton, fighters and potential recruits discuss the rise of the Islamic State, the inevitability of factory farming, and more

Cover photo by Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Chances that a doctor’s diagnosis of Lyme disease is erroneous:

4 in 5

Engineers were said to be at greater risk of becoming terrorists.

A deaf dog belonging to a deaf owner was shot and killed in Alabama, and an Indiana dog’s skin troubles were found to be caused by an allergy to humans. “It’s just not his fault,” said the owner of Lucky Dog Retreat.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

In Praise of Idleness

By

“I hope that after reading the following pages the leaders of the Y. M. C. A. will start a campaign to induce good young men to do nothing. If so, I shall not have lived in vain.”

Subscribe Today