Official Business — May 29, 2012, 4:24 pm

Harper’s Summer Web Internship

Dear Readers,

We’re looking for a summer web intern. The term is flexible, but will begin toward the end of June and run until at least the end of August. Applications are due by midnight on June 11.

This will be an excellent time to be at the magazine, as we’re relaunching Harpers.org in the fall—you’ll have plenty of opportunity to learn and be involved. You’ll be working closely with one of our associate editors to prepare for the relaunch, delving into an archive that features David Foster Wallace, Elif Batuman, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Barbara Ehrenreich, Alice Munro, William Faulkner, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Mark Twain, and many others. You’ll also be welcome to participate in Index and other editorial meetings.

The position is unpaid, though will offer occasional opportunities for web bylines and remuneration for small projects, as well as college credit if you’re a student. We’re asking for a minimum of three days a week; if you’d prefer to be in the office for four or five, terrific. The candidate we’re looking for is:

• a reader of Harper’s Magazine
• deeply engaged by American and world history, politics, and culture
• enthusiastic and informed about magazines, the web, and social media
• familiar with basic HTML and adaptable to new software
• self-motivated, full of ideas, and easy to work with
• available to work in New York City for the duration of the internship
 

To apply, please send a CV and a letter of no more than one page, indicating how the internship fits in with your interests and goals, before June 11 to webinternship@harpers.org. Please state your availability in your letter. Questions can also go to webinternship@harpers.org.

Thanks very much for your interest.

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