Editor's Note — July 11, 2013, 2:00 pm

Introducing the August 2013 Issue

How we sleep (or don’t), the decline of North American fisheries, and scent sense

Harper's Magazine (August 2013)

This month, we’ve published a Forum on something precious and, for many of us, elusive: a good night’s sleep. We asked some of our favorite writers to participate — Rebecca Curtis, A. Roger Ekirch, Heidi Julavits, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Sarah Manguso, Hamilton Morris, Christine Smallwood, Rebecca Solnit, Deb Olin Unferth — and although some of them had to work through the fog of a sleep-deprived brain, the essays they have produced are funny, informative, and heartfelt. Our Forum, “Are You Sleeping?,” covers such topics as bed-wetting cures, cuddle clinics for Japanese bachelors, self-experimentation with gray-market insomnia treatments, how to keep from killing your noisy neighbors, and the superhuman feats of nursing mothers.

The Sea of Cortez, which separates the Baja California peninsula from the mainland of Mexico, was until quite recently so abundant in sea life that Jacques Cousteau dubbed it the “Aquarium of the World.” Once host to a thousand species of fish, porpoises, shrimp, and turtles, the sea is being emptied by a combination of small fishing boats called pangas and large industrial trawlers. Reporter Erik Vance spent several months in the Baja, talking to fishermen and trawler operators, as well as marine biologists and shrimp farmers. He found that as the fish population declines, hookah divers along the peninsula’s shores will be forced to deeper, more dangerous depths; fishermen will have to harvest less-desirable species such as jellyfish; and many will turn to other livelihoods, such as running drugs. What is happening to the Sea of Cortez, Vance says, is essentially an early-warning signal for the world’s oceans.

Beau Friedlander explores the biology of smell, covering its history, its attendant superstitions, and its modern-day exploitation by everyone from hotel chains to the U.S. military. In his account, the odor of death is revealed as a potential weapon, while the odor of newly fallen rain becomes the Holy Grail of perfume research. This miscellany is also packed with fascinating tidbits: house flies smell with their antennae; salmon can sniff out their ancestral spawning streams from thousands of miles away; Helen Keller could deduce a person’s occupation by the scent of his or her clothes.

Elsewhere, Lorrie Moore reviews Jane Campion’s mini-series Top of the Lake, and Michelle Orange discusses Richard Linklater’s conjugal trilogy, which just wrapped up with Before Midnight. Thomas Frank, who began his career with a book about American advertising in the Sixties, finally turns his attention to Mad Men and its discontents. And in this month’s fiction, “The Way Things Are Going,” Lynn Freed expertly fuses South African politics with the struggle of an individual family.

Share
Single Page

More from Ellen Rosenbush:

Editor's Note July 21, 2016, 3:35 pm

Inside the August Issue

Martin Amis on the rise of Trump, Tom Wolfe on the origins of speech, Art Spiegelman on Si Lewen, fiction by Diane Williams, and more

Editor's Note June 16, 2016, 3:38 pm

Inside the July Issue

Tom Bissell on touring Israel with Christian Zionists, Joy Gordon on the Cuban embargo, Lawrence Jackson on Freddie Gray and the makings of an American uprising, a story by Paul Yoon, and more

Editor's Note May 13, 2016, 1:31 pm

Inside the June Issue

Helen Ouyang on the cost of crowd-sourcing drugs, Paul Wood on Trump’s supporters, Walter Kirn on political predictions, Sonia Faleiro on a man’s search for his kidnapped children, and Rivka Galchen on The People v. O. J. Simpson.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

October 2016

Held Back

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Division Street

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Innocents

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Quiet Car

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Psychedelic Trap

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Hamilton Cult

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
The Hamilton Cult·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"The past is complicated, and explaining it is not just a trick, but a gamble."
Illustration by Jimmy Turrell
Article
Division Street·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Perfectly sane people lose access to housing every day, though the resultant ordeal may undermine some of that sanity, as it might yours and mine."
Photograph © Robert Gumpert
Article
Held Back·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"'We don’t know where the money went!' a woman cried out. 'They looted it! They stole our money!'"
Artwork by Mischelle Moy
Article
The Quiet Car·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Flor Arely Sánchez had been in bed with a fever and pains throughout her body for three days when a July thunderstorm broke over the mountainside. She got nervous when bolts of light flashed in the sky. Lightning strikes the San Julián region of western El Salvador several times a year, and her neighbors fear storms more than they fear the march of diseases — first dengue, then chikungunya, now Zika. Flor worried about a lot of things, since she was pregnant.

Late in the afternoon, when the pains had somewhat eased, Flor thought she might go to a dammed-up bit of the river near her house to bathe. She is thirty-five and has lived in the same place all her life, where wrinkled hills are planted with corn, beans, and fruit trees. She took a towel and soap and walked out into the rain. Halfway to the river, the pains returned and overcame her. The next thing Flor remembers, she was in a room she didn’t recognize, unable to move. As she soon discovered, she was in a hospital, her ankle cuffed to the bed, and she was being investigated for abortion.

Photograph by Joshua Lutz
Article
Innocents·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"The next thing Flor remembers, she was in a room she didn’t recognize, unable to move. As she soon discovered, she was in a hospital, her ankle cuffed to the bed, and she was being investigated for abortion."
Photograph © Nadia Shira Cohen

Average number of new microwave food products introduced every day In 1987:

2

Cocaine addicts prefer $500 in cash now to $1,000 worth of cocaine later.

Scientists in the Galápagos Islands credited an endangered giant tortoise named Diego with saving his species by fathering more than 800 offspring.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Mississippi Drift

By

Matt was happy enough to sustain himself on the detritus of a world he saw as careening toward self-destruction, and equally happy to scam a government he despised. 'I’m glad everyone’s so wasteful,' he told me. 'It supports my lifestyle.'

Subscribe Today