Special Feature — August 29, 2013, 8:00 am

Censorship In the Republic

How foreign media are filtered in Iran

In the September 2013 issue of Harper’s Magazine, now with subscribers and on newsstands, we published photographs, shot inside the Republic of Iran, under the byline Anonymous. Included were two pictures showing censored images from foreign magazines. Below are nineteen photos of images that were altered in different publications, whether by Iranian authorities or by magazine sellers hoping to stay out of trouble with the authorities. All photographs © the artist.

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

 

Censored magazine image, Iran. © The artist

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More from Anonymous:

From the September 2013 issue

In the Republic

Photographs from Iran

  • Walker

    So strange to actually see it. Why are they so uptight about bare skin?

    • Adam

      It’s because you might have a boner, which is the first manifestation of anarchy

  • techcafe

    OUR ALLIES in GCC petro-monarchies (Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, UAE) are absolute dictatorships—whereas Iran is an Islamic democracy, with parliamentary representation for religious minorities, including Iran’s Jewish community (the largest Jewish community in the Middle East outside of Israel). the US-backed Saudi Kingdom, on the other hand, is far more repressive than Iran; Saudi women, for example, are prohibited from driving cars or travelling outside the home without a male guardian; and must get permission from male relatives to work, travel or even undertake medical procedures. the medieval Kingdom brutally represses-executes-political dissidents, apostates, ‘witches’, migrant workers, minorities, et al. weekly executions by beheading are practically a tourist attraction in Riyadh’s “Chop Chop Square” (Deera Square).

    before we go criticizing Iran, should we not clean up our own back yard first? i mean, if we’re looking for tyrannical dictatorships to point fingers at (or overthrow as the United States has a nasty habit of doing), then perhaps we should start with those autocratic puppet regimes & monarchies that WE support and prop-up (bribe) with billions in weapons and military equipment. otherwise, we kinda end up looking like foolish hypocrites, shamelessly imposing our double standards on the world, as always.

    • John

      way to hit the nail on the head.

  • Nabljuduvach

    The Iranians only seem to be concerned about images. In Saudi Arabia the authorities are concerned about them too (women, non-Islamic religious symbols, booze), and, like the Iranians, make free with marking pen and sticky paper – which can sometimes be pulled off, I found. But the Saudi censors also take a hard look at the text, and anything they don’t like gets ripped out. Annoying as all hell if the other side of the page carries the continuation of an article you were interested in.