Official Business — November 15, 2013, 11:53 am

Harper’s Magazine Now Available for iOS (and Soon for Android!)

Introducing the Harper’s app

iPad December 2013 screen capDear Readers,

We’re pleased to announce the launch of a Harper’s Magazine app for iOS, and the imminent launch of an app for Android. Henceforth, print subscribers will be able to read Harper’s on their tablets and smartphones free of charge, while other readers around the world will be able to subscribe and purchase single issues directly on their devices.

iPhone December 2013 screen capWe developed our app in partnership with 29th Street Publishing, which has built and published apps for Poetry, ProPublica, The Awl, and many others. Their publishing system makes it relatively simple for us to publish a mobile-friendly magazine that honors the simple, elegant design of the print edition of Harper’s while enhancing other aspects of the magazine, like our award-winning photography.

The challenges of rebuilding in HTML a magazine designed for print are many, and we owe thanks and congratulations to the team at 29th Street, and especially to Natalie Podrazik, Nozlee Samadzadeh, Tim Moore, and David Jacobs, who did much of the hands-on development. We’ll be working with them in the coming months to improve the app’s design and add new features, and to make your experience moving between the print and app editions and the 163-year archive on Harpers.org as seamless as possible.

WelcomeIn the short term, we hope you’ll draw our attention to any bugs you encounter, whether in the comments below or by emailing us at app@harpers.org. In the long term, we’re considering ideas like customized versions of features like the Annotation, delivery of the Harper’s Weekly Review via the app, and interfaces for the searchable Harper’s Index and Findings. If you have other thoughts, please get in touch.

To learn more about the app, including subscription options and (soon-to-be) frequently asked questions, please visit harpers.org/iOS. To download it for iOS, please visit the iTunes store.

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