Weekly Review — November 1, 2016, 5:56 pm

Weekly Review

The FBI continues its investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails, a Russian weapons manufacturer unveils a missile capable of destroying Texas, and a chimpanzee in North Korea smokes a pack of cigarettes 

the magnificent bird of paradise.

the magnificent bird of paradise.

More than 140 Native Americans and their supporters were arrested near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota during ongoing protests against the proposed Dakota Access pipeline, which will transport more than 450,000 barrels of crude a day from the state’s northwestern region to Patoka, Illinois.[1][2] Protesters threw logs and feces at police officers, who shot rubber bullets at their horses.[3] Seven armed antigovernment militiamen who occupied Malheur National Wildlife Refuge earlier this year were acquitted of firearm possession in a federal facility and conspiracy to impede federal workers, and at least 1,000 children who were evicted from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais, France, were reportedly living in nearby shipping containers. “Mission accomplished,” said the prefect of the region.[4][5] FBI director James Comey announced that the agency would continue its investigation of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server after potentially relevant emails were found on devices owned by former congressman Anthony Weiner, who is under investigation for sending lewd text messages to an underage girl.[6][7] Senate minority leader Harry Reid accused Comey of breaking the law by making the announcement so close to the election, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump praised the decision. “The system might not be as rigged as I thought,” he said.[8][9] It was reported that as many as 900 Islamic State fighters were killed in Mosul, Iraq, during Iraqi-led efforts to reclaim control of the city; 60 people were killed in an attack on a police academy in Quetta, Pakistan; and at least 26 people, including children, were killed at a school in northwestern Syria when it was struck by air raids linked to Russia.[10][11][12] A Russian missile company unveiled the RS-28, a 100-ton intercontinental ballistic rocket with a 6,835-mile range nicknamed Satan 2, which they claimed could “wipe out parts of the earth the size of Texas or France.”[13][14]

The World Meteorological Organization warned that 2016 could be the first time in 5 million years that carbon dioxide levels remained above 400 parts per million, scientists predicted that more than two thirds of the world’s wild animals could be gone by 2020, and a glaciologist in Antarctica died when he drove his snowmobile into a crevasse.[15][16][17] In Amsterdam, inventors unveiled a vacuum cleaner that they claimed could suck air from more than four miles above the earth’s surface and filter out fine particles, and a man in Portland, Maine, was arresting for obstructing traffic while dressed as an evergreen tree.[18][19] A man in Saudi Arabia filed for divorce two hours after his wedding when he learned that his wife had shared their wedding photos on Snapchat, and authorities in Chechnya began sending representatives to monitor weddings to ensure no “nontraditional” behavior, including firing guns and brides dancing, took place.[20][21] In Iceland, thousands of women left their jobs at 2:38 P.M., with 14 percent of their workday remaining, to protest the country’s 14 percent gender pay gap, and researchers reported that the gender gap in alcohol consumption is narrowing in younger generations.[22][23] The former personal sushi chef for North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said that Kim had bragged about drinking ten bottles of Bordeaux wine in one evening, and it was reported that a chimpanzee in Pyongyang Zoo, in the nation’s capital, smokes a pack of cigarettes per day.[24][25]

A 20-year-old woman in Texas was arrested after she rear-ended a police car while trying to take a topless selfie, a man in Arizona stopped to order food at an In-N-Out Burger drive-through window while being chased by police, and a 28-year-old man in Florida fell out of and then had his leg run over by his pickup truck on his way home from a strip club.[26][27][28] It was reported that the 531-foot-tall steeple of the tallest church in the world, in Ulm, Germany, is eroding because it is coated with urine and vomit, and the Catholic Church announced that scattering the ashes of a cremated person could give the appearance of nihilism.[29][30] Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said that he had promised God he would stop cursing while on a flight from Japan. “I heard a voice telling me to stop swearing,” he said, “or the plane will crash.”[31] Schools in at least nine states banned children from dressing up as clowns for Halloween, and it was reported that because of a number of threatening clown sightings around the world, McDonald’s would stop displaying Ronald McDonald in public.[32] Police in California arrested a man dressed as a “Psycho Teddy Bear” who was carrying two hunting knives, researchers from the American Chemical Society concluded that eating 262 pieces of “Fun Size” Halloween candy could be lethal, and parents in Oregon were advised to check their children’s Halloween candy for edible marijuana. “The candies,” said a toxicologist at the Oregon Poison Center, “could get mixed up.”[33][34][35]

Share
Single Page

More from Sharon J. Riley:

Weekly Review April 26, 2017, 4:46 pm

Weekly Review

Marine Le Pen qualifies for the second round of the French presidential election, Bill O’Reilly is fired from Fox News, and Russia announces it is not “creating a Terminator.”

Weekly Review March 16, 2017, 2:17 pm

Weekly Review

South Korea’s president is removed from office, Kellyanne Conway suggests that Barack Obama could have spied on Donald Trump using “microwaves that turned into cameras,” and a lake in Australia turns pink.

Weekly Review November 29, 2016, 4:01 pm

Weekly Review

Fidel Castro dies at 90, snow falls in Tokyo for the first time in 50 years, and scientists suggest that the speed of light has declined.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2017

Bee-Brained

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Mothers

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Facing the Furies

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The New Climate

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Dream Preferred

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Snowden’s Box

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Snowden’s Box·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

MAHARIDGE

It was a frigid winter, and the Manhattan loft was cold — very cold. Something was wrong with the gas line and there was no heat. In a corner, surrounding the bed, sheets had been hung from cords to form a de facto tent with a small electric heater running inside. But the oddities didn’t end there: when I talked to the woman who lived in the loft about her work, she made me take the battery out of my cell phone and stash the device in her refrigerator. People who have dated in New York City for any length of time believe that they’ve seen everything — this was something new.

Illustration (detail) by Taylor Callery
Post
The Forty-Fifth President·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Our ongoing coverage of Donald Trump's presidency

Photograph (detail) by Philip Montgomery
Article
A Prayer’s Chance·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Samuel Donkoh had just turned ten when he began to slip away. His brother Martin, two years his senior, first realized something was wrong during a game of soccer with a group of kids from the neighborhood. One minute Samuel was fine, dribbling the ball, and the next he was doubled over in spasms of laughter, as if reacting to a joke nobody else had heard. His teammates, baffled by the bizarre display, chuckled along with him, a response Samuel took for mockery. He grew threatening and belligerent, and Martin was forced to drag him home.

Photograph (detail) by Robin Hammond/NOOR
Article
Bee-Brained·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The final two contestants of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, held just outside Washington last May, had gone head-to-head for ten rounds. Nihar Janga, a toothy eleven-year-old with a bowl cut and the vocal pitch of a cartoon character, delighted the audience by breaking with custom: instead of asking the official pronouncer for definitions, he provided them himself. Taoiseach: “Is this an Irish prime minister?” (Yes.) Biniou: “Is this a Breton bagpipe?” (Right again.) His opponent, Jairam Hathwar, a stoic thirteen-year-old, had been favored to win, in large part because his older brother, Sriram, had won in 2014.

Illustration (detail) by Eda Akaltun. Source photograph of Jairam Hathwar at the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee © Pete Marovich/UPI/Newscom
Article
My First Car·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter

Amount Greece’s ruling Syriza party believes that Germany owes Greece in war reparations:

$172,000,000,000

Americans of both sexes prefer the body odors of people with similar political beliefs.

Tens of thousands of people marched to promote science in cities across the world, and Trump issued an Earth Day statement in which he did not mention climate change.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Who Goes Nazi?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

Subscribe Today