Conversation

Conversation — March 26, 2014, 8:00 am

The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Conversation with John Banville

John Banville on Raymond Chandler, literary inhabitation, and the stylish prose of dishwasher instruction manuals

JohnBanville-BarryMcCall-150

Conversation — March 20, 2014, 1:18 pm

The Prisoner: A Conversation with Omar Shahid Hamid

Omar Shahid Hamid on novelizing Karachi’s cops and gangsters

Omar Shahid Hamid

Conversation — March 5, 2014, 2:37 pm

Living with a Wild God: A Conversation with Barbara Ehrenreich

Barbara Ehrenreich on writing, social activism, and the possible existence of a mystical Other

Barbara Ehrenreich © Peter Abzug

Conversation — October 24, 2013, 8:00 am

Darling: A Conversation with Richard Rodriguez

Richard Rodriguez on the essay as biography of an idea, the relationship between gay men’s liberation and women’s liberation, and the writerly impulse to give away secrets

Richard Rodriguez © Timothy Archibald

Conversation — July 17, 2013, 8:00 am

Snoop Snoop Song: A Conversation with Glenn Greenwald

Glenn Greenwald on the importance of privacy, the hypocrisy of Democrats, and how he almost lost the NSA leak

Glenn Greenwald

Conversation — June 20, 2013, 8:00 am

(One Generation) Beyond Good and Evil: A Conversation with Rebecca Makkai

Rebecca Makkai on reconciling family history in writing

Rebecca Makkai (thumb)

Conversation — February 21, 2013, 9:00 am

Portrait Inside My Head and To Show and To Tell

Phillip Lopate on eclectic curiosities and the old-school essayists

Philip Lopate

Conversation — December 12, 2012, 12:51 pm

A Conversation With Russell Banks

“[T]o be an artist . . . you really have to blast the launch pad to get liftoff, scorching everything and everyone around you, and you cause a lot of damage sometimes.”

Russell Banks (thumb)

Conversation — February 23, 2011, 6:27 pm

New Books: A Conversation with Zadie Smith

On February 2, 2011, Harper’s Magazine and New York University’s Creative Writing Program held a discussion between Harper’s New Books columnist Zadie Smith and Reviews editor Gemma Sieff. The following is a transcript of their conversation, which covered such topics as the influence of motherhood on female novelists throughout history, the peculiar pitfalls faced by authors who write both fiction and criticism, and the place of Eminem in the hip-hop canon. Smith’s first New Books column for Harper’s appears in the March 2011 issue, now available on newsstands and to subscribers on harpers.org. Gemma Sieff: I am so honored to …

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“1. Death, The Sound of Perseverance (Nuclear Blast, 1998)”
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“He explained how sober Doug structured the bits and worked out the material’s logic; drunk Doug found the funny.”
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Discussed in this essay:

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, by Elizabeth Kolbert. Henry Holt. 352 pages. $28.

The extinction symbol is a spare graphic that began to appear on London walls and sidewalks a couple of years ago. It has since become popular enough as an emblem of protest that people display it at environmental rallies. Others tattoo it on their arms. The symbol consists of two triangles inscribed within a circle, like so:

“The triangles represent an hourglass; the circle represents Earth; the symbol as a whole represents, according to a popular Twitter feed devoted to its dissemination (@extinctsymbol, 19.2K followers), “the rapidly accelerating collapse of global biodiversity” — what scientists refer to alternately as the Holocene extinction, the Anthropocene extinction, and (with somewhat more circumspection) the sixth mass extinction.

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Consume, Screw, Kill·

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“Now may be the unlikeliest time for us to grow a conscience about how our rapacity is endangering other species, since we’re now aware of how frightfully our rapacity is endangering us.”
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Percentage of Americans who say they would not enjoy spending time with their own clone:

70

Astronomers recorded the most powerful pulse of radiation ever observed; the radiation was emitted from a pulsar 12,000 light-years from Earth and was “capable of totally vaporising and ionising all known materials, shredding them into hot plasma.”

Alberta dentist Michael Zuk, the owner of a molar that belonged to John Lennon, revealed that he hoped to clone a new Lennon and raise him as a son. “Hopefully keep him away from drugs,” said Zuk, “but, you know, guitar lessons wouldn’t hurt.”

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