[No Comment ]Mises on the Struggle for Freedom as a Struggle Against Those in Power | Harper's Magazine

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[No Comment]

Mises on the Struggle for Freedom as a Struggle Against Those in Power

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It is a double-edged makeshift to entrust an individual or a group of individuals with the authority to resort to violence. The enticement implied is too tempting for a human being. The men who are to protect the community against violent aggression easily turn into the most dangerous aggressors. They transgress their mandate. They misuse their power for the oppression of those whom they were expected to defend against oppression. The main political problem is how to prevent the police power from becoming tyrannical. This is the meaning of all the struggles for liberty. The essential characteristic of Western civilization that distinguishes it from the arrested and petrified civilizations of the East was and is its concern for freedom from the state. The history of the West, from the age of the Greek polis down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.

Ludwig von Mises, The Ultimate Foundation of Economic Science, ch. 5, pt. 10 (Van Nostrand ed. 1962)

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