Weekly Review — October 7, 2003, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

The Bush Administration rejected calls for an independent counsel in the matter of Valerie Plame, whose identity as an undercover CIA operative was revealed by at least one senior White House official, possibly Karl Rove, in retribution for her husband’s skeptical remarks about the president’s case against Iraq.New York TimesRove, the president’s political adviser, denied being the source of the leak, though he was reportedly fired from George H.W. Bush’s 1992 reelection campaign for leaking damaging information about a rival to Bob Novak, the very columnist who exposed Plame in July.TalkingpointsMemo.comPlame and Rove, it was reported, attend the same Episcopal church.New York TimesPresident Bush created a new “Iraq Stabilization Group.”New York TimesA new poll found that most Americans think the country is on the wrong track.New York TimesAmerican officials said that there are 650,000 tons of ammunition lying around Iraq, much of it unsecured. General John Abizaid told Congress that “there is more ammunition in Iraq than any place I’ve ever been in my life, and it is all not securable.” Pentagon officials had previously claimed that “all known Iraqi munitions sites are being secured by coalition forces.”New York TimesDavid Kay, the head of the CIA team searching for traces of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, issued his status report; Kay admitted that no unconventional weapons had been found but did point to a single vial of botulinum toxin, which an Iraqi scientist had stored in his refrigerator since 1993, as evidence of evil intent. President Bush cited the vial and said that the report justified the invasion.Washington Post, International Herald TribuneIt was noticed that Joe M. Allbaugh, President Bush’s former campaign manager and until recently the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has set up a consulting firm to help clients exploit the occupation of Iraq. According to the company’s website, “New Bridge Strategies, LLC is a unique company that was created specifically with the aim of assisting clients to evaluate and take advantage of business opportunities in the Middle East following the conclusion of the U.S.-led war in Iraq.” The company describes the “opportunities” in Iraq as “unprecedented” in nature and in scope.New Bridge StrategiesAllbaugh was apparently exasperated by the attention being paid his new company: “Because my friend is president of the United States,” he said, “I’m supposed to check out of life?”New York Times

A two-year-old Iraqi girl was shot dead in her home by American forces after a roadside bomb went off next to a military convoy. “If we determine there were deaths and/or injuries to innocent civilians as a result of U.S. forces responding to an attack,” said Major Anthony Aguto, “we will compensate the family with three years of standard Iraqi salary.” The grandfather of the dead girl said they didn’t want the money: “I submit my complaint only to God.”New York TimesIslamic Jihad took responsibility for a suicide attack in Haifa, Israel, that killed at least 19 people, including several children.Washington PostThree generations of the Zer-Aviv family, including four-year-old Liran and one-year-old Noya, their parents, and their grandmother, were killed.New York TimesThe bomber was a woman from Jenin, a law student, whose brother and cousin were killed by Israeli troops last June.Washington PostIsrael bombed Syria in retaliation for the attack.Washington PostAlmost 3 million people in Britain watched an illusionist play Russian roulette live on television,Guardianand Robin Cook, the former foreign minister and leader of the Commons, who resigned to protest Britain’s participation in the conquest of Iraq, claimed that Prime Minister Tony Blair admitted privately to him two weeks before the invasion that Saddam Hussein had no weapons that posed a “real and present danger.”BBCPresident Jacques Chirac of France gave Laura Bush a kiss.Washington PostPolice shot and killed a 900-pound moose that wandered into downtown Portland, Maine.New York TimesNewly released files suggested that the Mexican government used at least 360 snipers in a massacre of protesters on October 2, 1968.New York TimesEcuador launched a new punctuality campaign.ReutersGarbage was piling up in Chicago,New York Timesa rapper named C-Murder was found guilty of murder,Launchand Prime Minister Jean Chretien of Canada said that he was thinking of trying marijuana: “Perhaps I will try it when it will no longer be criminal. I will have my money for my fine and a joint in the other hand.”Reuters

The U.S. economy managed to create 57,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department reported, the first such gain since January, although the increase did not keep pace with population growth, and the percentage of adults with jobs fell to its lowest point in 10 years.New York TimesArnold Schwarzenegger apologized after 15 women came forward and accused him of sexually abusing them.SlateSchwarzenegger was also trying to explain comments he made years ago about his admiration for Adolf Hitler: “I admired Hitler for instance because he came from being a little man with almost no formal education, up to power. And I admire him for being such a good public speaker and for his way of getting to the people and so on.”New York TimesSchool officials in Paris, Texas, apologized after the high school band played “Deutschland uber alles,” with the Nazi flag flying, on the evening of Rosh Hashana.New York TimesRoy Horn, of Siegfried and Roy, was mauled by a rare white Bengal tiger during a Las Vegas performance and dragged offstage.San Francisco ChronicleNew York police officers discovered a 350-pound Bengal tiger in an apartment in Harlem; the police were called by a downstairs neighbor after “large amounts of urine” poured through the ceiling. A four-foot-long caiman was also removed from the apartment.New York TimesA new study found that large predators such as polar bears strongly dislike being caged in zoos.New York TimesA pitbull named Murder attacked a young boy in Newark, New Jersey, and nearly chewed off his foot.New York PostSix thousand three hundred New Jersians applied for permits for the state’s big upcoming bearhunt.New York TimesA Russian electricity company was threatening to kidnap people’s pets as a way to force delinquent customers to pay their bills.BBCA team of Swedish scientists concluded that the world’s remaining oil and gas supplies have been exaggerated by up to 80 percent and said that production levels will probably peak in 2010.CNNA new study estimated that 160,000 people die as a result of global warming every year; President Vladimir Putin suggested that global warming could be good for Russians because they “would spend less money on fur coats and other warm things.”ReutersKing Mohammed VI of Morocco sent 20 camels to Peru as a gift.Agence France-PresseLaura Bush told the Russians that American children’s books teach children to be good Americans and that her children used to enjoy acting out “Hop on Pop” by Dr. Seuss.ReutersMargaret Thatcher was said to be losing her mind.Sunday Mirror

Share
Single Page

More from Roger D. Hodge:

From the October 2010 issue

Speak, Money

Get access to 167 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

November 2017

Preaching to The Choir

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Monumental Error

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Star Search

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Pushing the Limit

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Bumpy Ride

Bad Dog

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Monumental Error·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In 1899, the art critic Layton Crippen complained in the New York Times that private donors and committees had been permitted to run amok, erecting all across the city a large number of “painfully ugly monuments.” The very worst statues had been dumped in Central Park. “The sculptures go as far toward spoiling the Park as it is possible to spoil it,” he wrote. Even worse, he lamented, no organization had “power of removal” to correct the damage that was being done.

Illustration by Steve Brodner
Article
Star Search·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

On December 3, 2016, less than a month after Donald Trump was elected president, Amanda Litman sat alone on the porch of a bungalow in Costa Rica, thinking about the future of the Democratic Party. As Hillary Clinton’s director of email marketing, Litman raised $180 million and recruited 500,000 volunteers over the course of the campaign. She had arrived at the Javits Center on Election Night, arms full of cheap beer for the campaign staff, minutes before the pundits on TV announced that Clinton had lost Wisconsin. Later that night, on her cab ride home to Brooklyn, Litman asked the driver to pull over so she could throw up.

Illustration by Taylor Callery
Article
Pushing the Limit·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In the early Eighties, Andy King, the coach of the Seawolves, a swim club in Danville, California, instructed Debra Denithorne, aged twelve, to do doubles — to practice in the morning and the afternoon. King told Denithorne’s parents that he saw in her the potential to receive a college scholarship, and even to compete in the Olympics. Tall swimmers have an advantage in the water, and by the time Denithorne turned thirteen, she was five foot eight. She dropped soccer and a religious group to spend more time at the pool.

Illustration by Shonagh Rae
Article
Bumpy Ride·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

One sunny winter afternoon in western Michigan, I took a ride with Leon Slater, a slight sixty-four-year-old man with a neatly trimmed white beard and intense eyes behind his spectacles. He wore a faded blue baseball cap, so formed to his head that it seemed he slept with it on. Brickyard Road, the street in front of Slater’s home, was a mess of soupy dirt and water-filled craters. The muffler of his mud-splattered maroon pickup was loose, and exhaust fumes choked the cab. He gripped the wheel with hands leathery not from age but from decades moving earth with big machines for a living. What followed was a tooth-jarring tour of Muskegon County’s rural roads, which looked as though they’d been carpet-bombed.

Photograph by David Emitt Adams
Article
Bad Dog·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Abby was a breech birth but in the thirty-one years since then most everything has been pretty smooth. Sweet kid, not a lot of trouble. None of them were. Jack and Stevie set a good example, and she followed. Top grades, all the way through. Got on well with others but took her share of meanness here and there, so she stayed thoughtful and kind. There were a few curfew or partying things and some boys before she was ready, and there was one time on a school trip to Chicago that she and some other kids got caught smoking crack cocaine, but that was so weird it almost proved the rule. No big hiccups, master’s in ecology, good state job that lets her do half time but keep benefits while Rose is little.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter

Tons of invasive carp that the Australian government plans to eradicate by giving them herpes:

1,137,000

Contact lenses change the microbiome of the eye such that it resembles skin.

A reporter asked Trump about a lunch the president was said to have shared the previous day with his secretary of state, Trump said the reporter was “behind the times” and that the lunch had occurred the previous week, and the White House confirmed that the lunch had in fact occurred the previous day.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Report — From the June 2013 issue

How to Make Your Own AR-15

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

Subscribe Today