Weekly Review — August 17, 2004, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

[Image: Caught in the Web, 1860]

Caught in the Web.

Governor James McGreevey of New Jersey announced that he is a “gay American” and resigned. “I am here today because, shamefully, I engaged in an adult consensual affair with another man, which violates my bonds of matrimony,” he said. “It was wrong. It was foolish. It was inexcusable.”Men’s News DailyThe California Supreme Court nullified gay marriages in that state, andSan Francisco Chroniclethere was a scandal in Australiancattle circles over udder doping.Associated PressPhilippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo told her countrymen to stop kissing her, andAssociated Pressfour people were arrested in the Philippines for killing, cooking, and eating a relative at a wedding reception.Associated PressTerry Nichols was sentenced to 161 life terms without parole for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing.IBSA British rapist who was out of prison for a weekend leave won the lottery, andThe SunDominican migrants, lost at sea on their way to Puerto Rico, threw a woman overboard when she refused to share her breast milk with other passengers.Associated PressA 480-pound Florida woman who had not left her couch for six years died when doctors attempted to separate her from the couch, which was fused to her body.WFTV.comA Jelly Belly factory was robbed, andReuterscrude oil prices were at record levels.ForbesPresident Saparmurat Niyazov of Turkmenistan ordered the construction of a palace of ice.BBCArabs hate America more than ever, according to a new poll,Palestine Chronicleand a man who was sued by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for selling “Arnie” bobblehead dolls announced that he will now sell “Arnie” urinal cakes and a “Girlie Man” bobblehead doll with the governor wearing a pink dress.Agence France-Presse

Hurricane Charley killed 13 people in Florida and caused an estimated $20 billion worth of damage.Reuters, New York TimesThere was heavy fighting in western Afghanistan.Associated PressPeace talks between the new Iraqi government and Moktada al-Sadr broke down;Times of Omanal-Sadr was reportedly wounded in a battle with American forces.CBSA British journalist was kidnapped in Basra and released a few days later; an Islamic website posted photographs of the beheading of an Egyptian.Associated PressAmerican warplanes bombed Fallujah.Associated PressCroatian explorers found the world’s deepest hole.Associated PressA plague of locusts was heading for Darfur, Sudan,Reuterswhere the national police force has been recruiting members of the Janjaweed militia.The ScotsmanHutu rebels attacked a refugee camp in Burundi and killed at least 159 Tutsis.ReutersThree British men who have been held in Guantnamo Bay for two years were preparing to meet their lawyers for the first time.IndependentA Pakistani man was in custody in North Carolina for videotaping skyscrapers.Associated PressAl Qaeda was reportedly planning a big assassination, andAgence France-PresseIran tested a new long-range ballistic missile.Associated PressRoughly 1,600 Palestinians in Israeli jails began a hunger strike to protest their conditions; “As far as I’m concerned, they can strike for a day, a month, until death,” said Tzahi Hanegbi, the Israeli security minister.BBCThe U.S. was planning to pull 70,000 troops out of Asia and Europe, andReutersNational Guard and reserve troops were losing their civilian jobs in greater numbers.ABC NewsA flaming rabbit burned down a British cricket club.Reuters

British researchers were granted a license to clone human stem cells.Associated PressA Texas dentist died after contracting a flesh-eating bacteria called vibrio vulnificus,Health Talka crow in Oregon tested positive for West Nile virus,Associated Pressand three Vietnamese died of bird flu.Associated PressIt was reported that HIV has crossed the species barrier from apes to humans at least seven times in recent years and that a new strain of HIV, which is undetectable by normal HIV tests, has appeared in Cameroon. Scientists said that eating bush meat is the most likely cause; earlier this year, three bush-meat hunters came down with simian foamy virus.New ScientistScientists at Purdue University were using ribonucleic acid to create self-assembling nanostructures.ReutersCzeslaw Milosz died.BBCPeople born in January and February, a study found, are at greatest risk of getting brain cancer, while those born in July and August are least likely to develop it.ReutersA twin delivered two sets of twins on her birthday.Associated PressPeople in Mottola, Italy, made a 2,280-foot-long salami sandwich.TelegraphJulia Child died.New York TimesA linguist at MIT found that women prefer men with names containing “front vowels” rather than “back vowels”; in an experiment performed using the Hot or Not website, men named Matt, Ed, and Mike were sexier than the same men when they were named Paul, Sean, or Roger.TelegraphScientists used a dopamine blocker to turn lazy monkeys into hard workers.Reuters

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In a Walmart parking lot in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 2015, a white police officer named Stephen Rankin shot and killed an unarmed, eighteen-­year-­old black man named William Chapman. “This is my second one,” he told a bystander seconds after firing the fatal shots, seemingly in reference to an incident four years earlier, when he had shot and killed another unarmed man, an immigrant from Kazakhstan. Rankin, a Navy veteran, had been arresting Chapman for shoplifting when, he claimed, Chapman charged him in a manner so threatening that he feared for his life, leaving him no option but to shoot to kill—­the standard and almost invariably successful defense for officers when called to account for shooting civilians. Rankin had faced no charges for his earlier killing, but this time, something unexpected happened: Rankin was indicted on a charge of first-­degree murder by Portsmouth’s newly elected chief prosecutor, thirty-­one-year-­old Stephanie Morales. Furthermore, she announced that she would try the case herself, the first time she had ever prosecuted a homicide. “No one could remember us having an actual prosecution for the killing of an unarmed person by the police,” Morales told me. “I got a lot of feedback, a lot of people saying, ‘You shouldn’t try this case. If you don’t win, it may affect your reelection. Let someone else do it.’ ”

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In 1973, when Barry Singer was a fifteen-year-old student at New York’s Yeshiva University High School for Boys, the vice principal, Rabbi George Finkelstein, stopped him in a stairwell. Claiming he wanted to check his tzitzit—the strings attached to Singer’s prayer shawl—Finkelstein, Singer says, pushed the boy over the third-floor banister, in full view of his classmates, and reached down his pants. “If he’s not wearing tzitzit,” Finkelstein told the surrounding children, “he’s going over the stairs!”

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