Weekly Review — August 17, 2004, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

[Image: Caught in the Web, 1860]

Caught in the Web.

Governor James McGreevey of New Jersey announced that he is a “gay American” and resigned. “I am here today because, shamefully, I engaged in an adult consensual affair with another man, which violates my bonds of matrimony,” he said. “It was wrong. It was foolish. It was inexcusable.”Men’s News DailyThe California Supreme Court nullified gay marriages in that state, andSan Francisco Chroniclethere was a scandal in Australiancattle circles over udder doping.Associated PressPhilippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo told her countrymen to stop kissing her, andAssociated Pressfour people were arrested in the Philippines for killing, cooking, and eating a relative at a wedding reception.Associated PressTerry Nichols was sentenced to 161 life terms without parole for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing.IBSA British rapist who was out of prison for a weekend leave won the lottery, andThe SunDominican migrants, lost at sea on their way to Puerto Rico, threw a woman overboard when she refused to share her breast milk with other passengers.Associated PressA 480-pound Florida woman who had not left her couch for six years died when doctors attempted to separate her from the couch, which was fused to her body.WFTV.comA Jelly Belly factory was robbed, andReuterscrude oil prices were at record levels.ForbesPresident Saparmurat Niyazov of Turkmenistan ordered the construction of a palace of ice.BBCArabs hate America more than ever, according to a new poll,Palestine Chronicleand a man who was sued by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for selling “Arnie” bobblehead dolls announced that he will now sell “Arnie” urinal cakes and a “Girlie Man” bobblehead doll with the governor wearing a pink dress.Agence France-Presse

Hurricane Charley killed 13 people in Florida and caused an estimated $20 billion worth of damage.Reuters, New York TimesThere was heavy fighting in western Afghanistan.Associated PressPeace talks between the new Iraqi government and Moktada al-Sadr broke down;Times of Omanal-Sadr was reportedly wounded in a battle with American forces.CBSA British journalist was kidnapped in Basra and released a few days later; an Islamic website posted photographs of the beheading of an Egyptian.Associated PressAmerican warplanes bombed Fallujah.Associated PressCroatian explorers found the world’s deepest hole.Associated PressA plague of locusts was heading for Darfur, Sudan,Reuterswhere the national police force has been recruiting members of the Janjaweed militia.The ScotsmanHutu rebels attacked a refugee camp in Burundi and killed at least 159 Tutsis.ReutersThree British men who have been held in Guantnamo Bay for two years were preparing to meet their lawyers for the first time.IndependentA Pakistani man was in custody in North Carolina for videotaping skyscrapers.Associated PressAl Qaeda was reportedly planning a big assassination, andAgence France-PresseIran tested a new long-range ballistic missile.Associated PressRoughly 1,600 Palestinians in Israeli jails began a hunger strike to protest their conditions; “As far as I’m concerned, they can strike for a day, a month, until death,” said Tzahi Hanegbi, the Israeli security minister.BBCThe U.S. was planning to pull 70,000 troops out of Asia and Europe, andReutersNational Guard and reserve troops were losing their civilian jobs in greater numbers.ABC NewsA flaming rabbit burned down a British cricket club.Reuters

British researchers were granted a license to clone human stem cells.Associated PressA Texas dentist died after contracting a flesh-eating bacteria called vibrio vulnificus,Health Talka crow in Oregon tested positive for West Nile virus,Associated Pressand three Vietnamese died of bird flu.Associated PressIt was reported that HIV has crossed the species barrier from apes to humans at least seven times in recent years and that a new strain of HIV, which is undetectable by normal HIV tests, has appeared in Cameroon. Scientists said that eating bush meat is the most likely cause; earlier this year, three bush-meat hunters came down with simian foamy virus.New ScientistScientists at Purdue University were using ribonucleic acid to create self-assembling nanostructures.ReutersCzeslaw Milosz died.BBCPeople born in January and February, a study found, are at greatest risk of getting brain cancer, while those born in July and August are least likely to develop it.ReutersA twin delivered two sets of twins on her birthday.Associated PressPeople in Mottola, Italy, made a 2,280-foot-long salami sandwich.TelegraphJulia Child died.New York TimesA linguist at MIT found that women prefer men with names containing “front vowels” rather than “back vowels”; in an experiment performed using the Hot or Not website, men named Matt, Ed, and Mike were sexier than the same men when they were named Paul, Sean, or Roger.TelegraphScientists used a dopamine blocker to turn lazy monkeys into hard workers.Reuters

Share
Single Page

More from Roger D. Hodge:

From the October 2010 issue

Speak, Money

Get access to 167 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

February 2018

The Bodies in The Forest

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Minds of Others

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Modern Despots

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Before the Deluge

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Notes to Self

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Within Reach

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
The Minds of Others·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Progress is impossible without change,” George Bernard Shaw wrote in 1944, “and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” But progress through persuasion has never seemed harder to achieve. Political segregation has made many Americans inaccessible, even unimaginable, to those on the other side of the partisan divide. On the rare occasions when we do come face-to-face, it is not clear what we could say to change each other’s minds or reach a worthwhile compromise. Psychological research has shown that humans often fail to process facts that conflict with our preexisting worldviews. The stakes are simply too high: our self-worth and identity are entangled with our beliefs — and with those who share them. The weakness of logic as a tool of persuasion, combined with the urgency of the political moment, can be paralyzing.

Yet we know that people do change their minds. We are constantly molded by our environment and our culture, by the events of the world, by the gossip we hear and the books we read. In the essays that follow, seven writers explore the ways that persuasion operates in our lives, from the intimate to the far-reaching. Some consider the ethics and mechanics of persuasion itself — in religion, politics, and foreign policy — and others turn their attention to the channels through which it acts, such as music, protest, and technology. How, they ask, can we persuade others to join our cause or see things the way we do? And when it comes to our own openness to change, how do we decide when to compromise and when to resist?

Illustration (detail) by Lincoln Agnew
Article
Within Reach·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

On a balmy day last spring, Connor Chase sat on a red couch in the waiting room of a medical clinic in Columbus, Ohio, and watched the traffic on the street. His bleached-blond hair fell into his eyes as he scrolled through his phone to distract himself. Waiting to see Mimi Rivard, a nurse practitioner, was making Chase nervous: it would be the first time he would tell a medical professional that he was transgender.

By the time he arrived at the Equitas Health clinic, Chase was eighteen, and had long since come to dread doctors and hospitals. As a child, he’d had asthma, migraines, two surgeries for a tumor that had caused deafness in one ear, and gangrene from an infected bug bite. Doctors had always assumed he was a girl. After puberty, Chase said, he avoided looking in the mirror because his chest and hips “didn’t feel like my body.” He liked it when strangers saw him as male, but his voice was high-pitched, so he rarely spoke in public. Then, when Chase was fourteen, he watched a video on YouTube in which a twentysomething trans man described taking testosterone to lower his voice and appear more masculine. Suddenly, Chase had an explanation for how he felt — and what he wanted.

Illustration by Taylor Callery
Article
Before the Deluge·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In the summer of 2016, when Congress installed a financial control board to address Puerto Rico’s crippling debt, I traveled to San Juan, the capital. The island owed some $120 billion, and Wall Street was demanding action. On the news, President Obama announced his appointments to the Junta de Supervisión y Administración Financiera. “The task ahead for Puerto Rico is not an easy one,” he said. “But I am confident Puerto Rico is up to the challenge of stabilizing the fiscal situation, restoring growth, and building a better future for all Puerto Ricans.” Among locals, however, the control board was widely viewed as a transparent effort to satisfy mainland creditors — just the latest tool of colonialist plundering that went back generations.

Photograph from Puerto Rico by Christopher Gregory
Article
Monumental Error·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In 1899, the art critic Layton Crippen complained in the New York Times that private donors and committees had been permitted to run amok, erecting all across the city a large number of “painfully ugly monuments.” The very worst statues had been dumped in Central Park. “The sculptures go as far toward spoiling the Park as it is possible to spoil it,” he wrote. Even worse, he lamented, no organization had “power of removal” to correct the damage that was being done.

Illustration by Steve Brodner
Post
CamperForce·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

After losing their savings in the stock market crash of 2008, seniors Barb and Chuck find seasonal employment at Amazon fulfillment centers.

Cost of a baby-stroller cleaning, with wheel detailing, at Tot Squad in New York City:

$119.99

Australian biologists trained monitor lizards not to eat cane toads.

Trump tweeted that he had created “jobs, jobs, jobs” since becoming president, and it was reported that Trump plans to bolster job creation by loosening regulations on the global sale of US-made artillery, warships, fighter jets, and drones.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Report — From the June 2013 issue

How to Make Your Own AR-15

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

Subscribe Today