Weekly Review — August 2, 2011, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

An angry-looking, monkey-like creature showing its teeth.

A kinkajou, 1886.

Democratic and Republican leaders concluded a week of fierce debate by agreeing on a “framework” deal to resolve the U.S. debt-ceiling crisis. Were the House and Senate to approve the deal, the ceiling would be raised for the seventy-ninth time in fifty years, increasing in the near term by $900 billion alongside an immediate $917 billion cut in federal discretionary spending. A bipartisan committee would be convened to seek ways of reducing the deficit by at least an additional $1.5 trillion in the next decade. The provisional agreement was reached only two days after the House passed and the Senate rejected John Boehner??s bill to cut spending by $917 billion. “Sausage making is not pretty,” said California senator Dianne Feinstein, “but the sausage we have, I think, is a very different sausage from when we started.”CNNNYTLATBarack Obama??s approval rating fell to 40 percent, the lowest mark of his presidency, and Apple Computer Inc. had more cash on hand than the U.S. Treasury.LATFinancial PostCongressman David Wu (D., Ore.) said he would step down because of allegations that he had a sexual encounter with the teenage daughter of a close friend.USA TodayEdwin Edwards, the octogenarian former governor of Louisiana, married his 32-year-old prison pen pal.IB TimesThe White House Rickrolled a man via Twitter.Billboard

The commander of Turkey’s armed forces, as well as the chiefs of its army, navy, and air force, resigned in protest following the arrest of about 250 officers on charges of conspiring against the government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is developing a new constitution to improve Turkish democracy.ReutersNational PostThousands of Salafists assembled in Cairo??s Tahrir Square to call for the implementation of shari??a law, and Syrian security forces killed 136 demonstrators in a single day.NYTThe AustralianFrance’s trade minister warned the German ambassador to Paris that plans to ban foie gras from a Cologne food fair would have “global repercussions,” Belarus proposed prohibiting people from standing in groups, and Malta legalized divorce.TelegraphNYTGuardianResearchers reported that the use of pink in awareness campaigns discourages women from donating to breast-cancer research.Ad AgeThe City of Dallas won the right to shut down The Playground, a local swingers’ club featuring topless dancers and bedroom services, which had been operating as an officially designated religious institution. “Just because they don??t agree with what we believe in, they want to throw it under the bus,” said the club??s owner, an Internet-ordained minister. “But can you throw the Catholic religion under the bus because of a few incidents with a few priests?”Dallas NewsA costumed Chuck E. Cheese mascot in New Mexico was accused of flipping off a four-year-old boy in a birthday photograph. “All Corbin really wanted was a hug from Chuck E. Cheese,” said the boy’s grandmother. “You know how little kids are with their idols.”El Paso TimesA latex mask of Casey Anthony sold for almost a million dollars on eBay.Examiner

After twenty-three years of analysis, psychologists established that “The Champ” (1979), which stars Jon Voight as an over-the-hill boxer who dies in front of his young son after a prizefight, is the saddest film ever made; “Kramer vs. Kramer” came second.CTV NewsMcDonald’s announced that it would add apple slices to Happy Meals.NYTScientists determined that saturated fat deters negative emotions, that rats can be vaccinated against heroin addiction, and that dolphins can detect electric fields with the whisker-pits on their snouts.CNNWPDiscover MagHours after seeing a cougar in his backyard, a Wisconsin sheriff shot a 20-year-old relative who was pretending to be the cougar as a prank, and a California woman accidentally shot her 12-year-old daughter with a miniature revolver she thought was a novelty cigarette lighter.WJFWLATAn elderly California man attempted to remove a hernia from his stomach with a butter knife, an ex-convict sought to hijack a New York City subway train with a screwdriver, and investigators revealed that at least 122 weapons recovered from crime scenes in Mexico were originally brought to the country as part of Operation Fast and Furious, a U.S. drug-trafficking sting.KTLANYDNNYTA San Francisco judge struck down a ballot measure to ban circumcision except when medically necessary, and an Australian woman whose face was injured while she was having sex in her hotel room during a business trip filed suit to demand worker??s compensation. “This case … is as much about slipping in the shower or being beaten by a gang of thugs or being shot by a jealous rival,” said the woman??s lawyer. “Having sex is just one of those things.”SF GateSMH

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In February 1947, Harper’s Magazine published Henry L. Stimson’s “The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb.” As secretary of war, Stimson had served as the chief military adviser to President Truman, and recommended the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The terms of his unrepentant apologia, an excerpt of which appears on page 35, are now familiar to us: the risk of a dud made a demonstration too risky; the human cost of a land invasion would be too high; nothing short of the bomb’s awesome lethality would compel Japan to surrender. The bomb was the only option. Seventy years later, we find his reasoning unconvincing. Entirely aside from the destruction of the blasts themselves, the decision thrust the world irrevocably into a high-stakes arms race — in which, as Stimson took care to warn, the technology would proliferate, evolve, and quite possibly lead to the end of modern civilization. The first half of that forecast has long since come to pass, and the second feels as plausible as ever. Increasingly, the atmosphere seems to reflect the anxious days of the Cold War, albeit with more juvenile insults and more colorful threats. Terms once consigned to the history books — “madman theory,” “brinkmanship” — have returned to the news cycle with frightening regularity. In the pages that follow, seven writers and experts survey the current nuclear landscape. Our hope is to call attention to the bomb’s ever-present menace and point our way toward a world in which it finally ceases to exist.

Illustration by Darrel Rees. Source photographs: Kim Jong-un © ITAR-TASS Photo Agency/Alamy Stock Photo; Donald Trump © Yuri Gripas/Reuters/Newscom
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The Ambassador Bridge arcs over the Detroit River, connecting Detroit to Windsor, Ontario, the southernmost city in Canada. Driving in from the Canadian side, where I grew up, is like viewing a panorama of the Motor City’s rise and fall, visible on either side of the bridge’s turquoise steel stanchions. On the right are the tubular glass towers of the Renaissance Center, headquarters of General Motors, and Michigan Central Station, the rail terminal that closed in 1988. On the left is a rusted industrial corridor — fuel tanks, docks, abandoned warehouses. I have taken this route all my life, but one morning this spring, I crossed for the first time in a truck.

Illustration by Richard Mia
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But the exercise of labor is the worker’s own life-activity, the manifestation of his own life. . . . He works in order to live. He does not even reckon labor as part of his life, it is rather a sacrifice of his life.

— Karl Marx

Photograph from the United Arab Emirates by the author. This page: Ruwais Mall
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To look at him, Sweet Macho was a beautiful horse, lean and strong with muscles that twitched beneath his shining black coat. A former racehorse, he carried himself with ceremony, prancing the field behind our house as though it were the winner’s circle. When he approached us that day at the edge of the yard, his eyes shone with what might’ve looked like intelligence but was actually a form of insanity. Not that there was any telling our mother’s boyfriend this — he fancied himself a cowboy.

“Horse 1,” by Nine Francois. Courtesy the artist and AgavePrint, Austin, Texas
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What We Think About When We Think About Soccer, by Simon Critchley. Penguin Books. 224 pages. $20.

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Tostão, No. 9, and Pelé, No. 10, celebrate Carlos Alberto’s final goal for Brazil in the World Cup final against Italy on June 21, 1970, Mexico City © Heidtmann/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Chance that a teenager in a New York City jail has a history of traumatic brain injury:

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Altruistic children tend to be healthier but from poorer families.

The prosecution told the jury that the officer, Philip Brailsford, was a “killer” for forcing Shaver, who was unarmed and intoxicated, into the hallway and then shooting him as he crawled on the floor crying and asking not to be shot.

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