Weekly Review — September 20, 2011, 12:00 am

Weekly Review

An angry-looking, monkey-like creature showing its teeth.

A kinkajou, 1886.

A Second World Warâ??era military plane crashed into a group of spectators at the Reno National Championship Air Races in Nevada, killing 10 people, including Jimmy Leeward, 74, who became the twentieth pilot to die at the event since it began 47 years ago. “It looked like just someone sprinkled Legos in every direction,” said one witness. National Transportation Safety Board investigators refused to speculate on what brought down the plane, which was built in 1944 and had previously crashed in 1970. “Our job is to identify what caused this accident,” said NTSB member Mark Rosekind, “so we can make safety recommendations so it doesnâ??t happen again.” The day after the Reno incident, a military plane crashed at a West Virginia air show, killing the pilot.Reno Gazette-JournalAssociated PressAP via Boston GlobeAP via CBSPresident Barack Obama proposed a $3 trillion deficit-reduction plan that included the “Buffett Rule,” which would increase taxes for the 0.3 percent of Americans who earn more than $1 million a year. Republicans contended that such an increase would discourage investment in new businesses and further stall job growth. “Class warfare may make for really good politics,” said Paul Ryan (R., Wis.), “but it makes for rotten economics.” “This is not class warfare,” said Obama. “Itâ??s math.”New York TimesNew York TimesThe Census Bureau announced that more Americans lived in poverty in 2010 than in any year since record-keeping began.Business WeekBob Turner, the creator of “The Jerry Springer Show,” won the House seat vacated by Anthony Weiner and became the first Republican elected in New Yorkâ??s Ninth Congressional District since 1920. “We have lit one candle today,” said Turner. “Itâ??s going to be a bonfire pretty soon.”Los Angeles TimesNew York TimesOfficials at a New Hampshire middle school confiscated an autistic studentâ??s American flag, citing safety concerns.Foster’s Daily Democrat

Rebel forces in Libya failed to capture Bani Walid, one of Muammar Qaddafiâ??s strongholds, and security forces in Yemen killed nearly 50 demonstrators in two days. “We were walking and chanting, â??Peaceful, peaceful,â??” said one protester. “They opened fire with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades.”ReutersAssociated PressLos Angeles TimesIran banned the television broadcast of love-triangle storylines and shirtless men, and Australia added to its passports the option to classify oneâ??s gender as indeterminate.ReutersSF ChronicleWith his final meal of fried chicken, fried fish, french fries, salad, apples, and jalapeño peppers already consumed, Texas death-row inmate Duane Buck was granted a stay of execution so the U.S. Supreme Court could investigate whether racism played a role in his sentencing. “Godâ??s mercy triumphs over judgment,” Buck said, “and I feel good.”CNNSix men from the Old Order Swartzentruber Amish were jailed in Kentucky for refusing to affix orange safety triangles to their buggies, and a Jewish professor at York University in Toronto who said in a lecture that the assertion “all Jews should be sterilized” constitutes an unacceptable opinion was accused of anti-Semitism by a student. “The words, â??Jews should be sterilizedâ?? still came out of his mouth,” said the student, “so regardless of the context I still think thatâ??s pretty serious.”CNNToronto StarResearchers determined that watching “SpongeBob SquarePants” diminishes the attention spans of four-year-olds, that fatherhood reduces testosterone levels, and that overconfidence leads to success.New York TimesSalt Lake TribuneInt’l Business TimesThe Swiss bank UBS revealed that an employee in London lost $2.3 billion of the companyâ??s money over three months through unauthorized trades.CNNIn Denmark, the worldâ??s largest sperm bank stopped accepting donations from redheads due to insufficient demand in all countries except Ireland; there, said Cryos director Ole Schou, redhead semen sold “like hot cakes.”Telegraph

Richard Hamilton, the Pop Art pioneer and White Album cover designer, died, as did Kara Kennedy, Edwardâ??s eldest child.New York TimesNew York TimesIowa police detained a statue of a man in a hot-dog suit, and in California a teenager surrendered after attempting to rob a San Diego 7-Eleven while wearing a Gumby costume.The Daily NonpareilReutersA drunk Swedish elk hid a swing set in a tree, Malaysian wildlife officials quarantined Shirley the orangutan in order to help her quit smoking, and black-tar heroin users contracted botulism in Seattle.The LocalThe SunLos Angeles TimesDenver police revealed that they had indicted two men who had gone for a night on the town with the corpse of a friend, charging drinks and food to his debit card, and withdrawing $400 of his money from an ATM at a strip club.Denver PostTwo teenage lesbian lovers arrested for burglarizing 29 Pennsylvania homes claimed theyâ??d encountered a lion at a thirtieth. “If we find a lion,” said police superintendent Michael Chitwood, “it will be a bigger story.”Philadelphia InquirerAn 83-year-old Arkansas woman was the victim of unsolicited toe-sucking, while a second woman whom the assailant approached described him as having “messed-up toes.”ReutersA British man whoâ??d accidentally sawed off his left thumb had his left big toe attached in its place. “He might need additional surgery,” said the overseeing doctor, “to make it look more like a thumb.”BBC

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In February 1947, Harper’s Magazine published Henry L. Stimson’s “The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb.” As secretary of war, Stimson had served as the chief military adviser to President Truman, and recommended the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The terms of his unrepentant apologia, an excerpt of which appears on page 35, are now familiar to us: the risk of a dud made a demonstration too risky; the human cost of a land invasion would be too high; nothing short of the bomb’s awesome lethality would compel Japan to surrender. The bomb was the only option. Seventy years later, we find his reasoning unconvincing. Entirely aside from the destruction of the blasts themselves, the decision thrust the world irrevocably into a high-stakes arms race — in which, as Stimson took care to warn, the technology would proliferate, evolve, and quite possibly lead to the end of modern civilization. The first half of that forecast has long since come to pass, and the second feels as plausible as ever. Increasingly, the atmosphere seems to reflect the anxious days of the Cold War, albeit with more juvenile insults and more colorful threats. Terms once consigned to the history books — “madman theory,” “brinkmanship” — have returned to the news cycle with frightening regularity. In the pages that follow, seven writers and experts survey the current nuclear landscape. Our hope is to call attention to the bomb’s ever-present menace and point our way toward a world in which it finally ceases to exist.

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The Ambassador Bridge arcs over the Detroit River, connecting Detroit to Windsor, Ontario, the southernmost city in Canada. Driving in from the Canadian side, where I grew up, is like viewing a panorama of the Motor City’s rise and fall, visible on either side of the bridge’s turquoise steel stanchions. On the right are the tubular glass towers of the Renaissance Center, headquarters of General Motors, and Michigan Central Station, the rail terminal that closed in 1988. On the left is a rusted industrial corridor — fuel tanks, docks, abandoned warehouses. I have taken this route all my life, but one morning this spring, I crossed for the first time in a truck.

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But the exercise of labor is the worker’s own life-activity, the manifestation of his own life. . . . He works in order to live. He does not even reckon labor as part of his life, it is rather a sacrifice of his life.

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To look at him, Sweet Macho was a beautiful horse, lean and strong with muscles that twitched beneath his shining black coat. A former racehorse, he carried himself with ceremony, prancing the field behind our house as though it were the winner’s circle. When he approached us that day at the edge of the yard, his eyes shone with what might’ve looked like intelligence but was actually a form of insanity. Not that there was any telling our mother’s boyfriend this — he fancied himself a cowboy.

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What We Think About When We Think About Soccer, by Simon Critchley. Penguin Books. 224 pages. $20.

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Tostão, No. 9, and Pelé, No. 10, celebrate Carlos Alberto’s final goal for Brazil in the World Cup final against Italy on June 21, 1970, Mexico City © Heidtmann/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Factor by which single Americans who use emoji are more likely than other single Americans to be sexually active:

1.85

Brontosaurus was restored as a genus, and cannibalism was reported in tyrannosaurine dinosaurs.

Moore said he did not “generally” date teenage girls, and it was reported that in the 1970s Moore had been banned from his local mall and YMCA for bothering teenage girls.

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