Weekly Review — May 27, 2014, 8:00 am

Weekly Review

A mass murder in Santa Barbara, nationalist and anti-E.U. parties are voted into the European Parliament, and 2Pac’s last words

ALL IN MY EYE.Elliot Rodger, the 22-year-old son of a second-unit director of The Hunger Games, allegedly stabbed his three housemates to death in the Isla Vista neighborhood near the University of California, Santa Barbara, then drove his BMW to a student district, where he struck pedestrians and fired a semiautomatic weapon out the passenger window, killing two women outside a sorority house and one man inside a deli, and injuring 13 others before shooting himself. The day before the murders, Rodger posted a video to YouTube titled “Elliot Rodger’s Retribution,” in which he outlined the planned assault and expressed frustration that attractive women had not slept with him and that he was still a virgin. Rodger’s parents had reportedly called police weeks earlier after seeing other threatening videos their son had uploaded, but officers conducting a welfare check found him “polite” and “kind.” “If they had demanded to search my room,” Rodger wrote in a 137-page manifesto, “that would have ended everything.”[1][2][3][4][5] Ukraine held its first presidential election since Viktor Yanukovych was ousted in February, voting in billionaire candy magnate Petro Poroshenko president with over 54 percent of the ballot. “He is the one who promises us a good life with European standards,” said a voter. “We hope he will take us into Europe.”[6][7][8][9] Far-right nationalist parties and “Euroskeptic” parties favoring a weaker European Union made significant gains in E.U. parliamentary elections, with the National Front earning an estimated 26 percent of the French vote, the U.K. Independence Party 28 percent of the British vote, and the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party 9 percent of the Greek vote. “It’s an earthquake,” said French prime minister Manuel Valls. Sweden elected one representative from the Feminist Initiative, the Netherlands elected one from the Party for the Animals, and a Russian circus crocodile named Fedya vomited for three hours and missed a performance after a 265-pound female accountant fell on top of him when their tour bus hit a bump.[10][11][12]

General Prayuth Chan-ocha declared martial law in Thailand, insisted the move was “not a coup d’état,” then staged a coup after rival political leaders failed to reach a compromise during two hours of negotiations at a military complex in Bangkok. “Sorry,” Prayuth told the group, “I’m taking power.”[13][14] The U.S. Department of Justice filed cyberespionage charges against five Chinese military officers accused of hacking into the computers of American companies and stealing trade secrets; the FBI announced that it had charged 97 people in 16 countries with using or distributing the software program BlackShades, which allows users to take over another computer’s webcam; and FBI director James Comey told attendees at the annual White Collar Crime Institute conference in Manhattan that the FBI might have to relax its zero-tolerance policy for marijuana use by potential employees. “I have to hire a great work force to compete with those cyber criminals,” said Comey, “and some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview.”[15][16][17] The U.S. Veterans Affairs Department announced that it was expanding to 26 VA facilities its investigation into allegations of record falsification and medical-treatment delays that might have led to patient deaths, and the National September 11 Memorial Museum opened to criticism from some victims’ families about the inclusion of a gift shop selling such items as New York Fire Department dog vests and earrings fashioned from trees that survived the 9/11 attacks.[18][19]

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

Polk State College in Lakeland, Florida, announced that it would begin using a third party to verify job candidates’ diplomas and transcripts after discovering that business professor David Broxterman had falsified his Ph.D. credentials, including a diploma on which the word “board” had been misspelled, and it was reported that Paris Gray, senior class vice president at Mundy’s Mill High School in Clayton County, Georgia, had been forbidden to participate in a “senior walk” after officials realized that Gray’s yearbook quote included a list of chemical elements whose abbreviations spelled “BaCK ThAt AsS UP.”[20][21] Florida state prosecutor Ken Lewis apologized for posting a message to Facebook that read, “Happy Mother’s Day to all the crack hoes out there. It’s never too late to turn it around. Tie your tubes.” “I used a poor choice of words by using the term ‘crack hoe’ instead of ‘drug addict,’ ” said Lewis. “But my message is the same.”[22] Law-enforcement officials announced the arrests of 71 New York City–area residents for trading child pornography, including a rabbi, a nanny, a Boy Scout den leader, and former Mount Pleasant police chief Brian Fanelli, who allegedly told investigators he began looking at child porn as research for sexual-abuse awareness classes he taught at local schools, and that it grew into a “personal interest.”[23] Chris Carroll, a retired Las Vegas bike patrolman who was the first police officer on the scene after rapper Tupac Shakur was fatally shot in 1996, revealed Shakur’s last words, spoken in response to Carroll’s prods to identify his assailant. “He looked at me, and he took a breath to get the words out, and he opened his mouth,” said Carroll, “and then the words came out: ‘Fuck you.’ ”[24]


Sign up and get the Weekly Review delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning.

Share
Single Page

More from Sara Breselor:

Weekly Review April 14, 2015, 8:00 am

Weekly Review

Michael Slager is charged with murder, Hillary Clinton declares her candidacy for president, and a Utah television personality gets probation for kicking a barn owl

Weekly Review January 20, 2015, 8:00 am

Weekly Review

The Pope says climate change is mostly man made, Al Qaeda claims responsibility for the attack on Charlie Hebdo, and residents of a town in Denmark agree to have sex more often

Weekly Review December 23, 2014, 8:00 am

Weekly Review

North Korea attacks the U.S. film industry, Pakistan reinstates the death penalty, and a Pennsylvania electrician stabs a Virgin Mary lawn ornament in the head

Get access to 167 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

November 2017

Preaching to The Choir

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Monumental Error

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Star Search

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Pushing the Limit

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Bumpy Ride

Bad Dog

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Monumental Error·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In 1899, the art critic Layton Crippen complained in the New York Times that private donors and committees had been permitted to run amok, erecting all across the city a large number of “painfully ugly monuments.” The very worst statues had been dumped in Central Park. “The sculptures go as far toward spoiling the Park as it is possible to spoil it,” he wrote. Even worse, he lamented, no organization had “power of removal” to correct the damage that was being done.

Illustration by Steve Brodner
Article
Star Search·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

On December 3, 2016, less than a month after Donald Trump was elected president, Amanda Litman sat alone on the porch of a bungalow in Costa Rica, thinking about the future of the Democratic Party. As Hillary Clinton’s director of email marketing, Litman raised $180 million and recruited 500,000 volunteers over the course of the campaign. She had arrived at the Javits Center on Election Night, arms full of cheap beer for the campaign staff, minutes before the pundits on TV announced that Clinton had lost Wisconsin. Later that night, on her cab ride home to Brooklyn, Litman asked the driver to pull over so she could throw up.

Illustration by Taylor Callery
Article
Pushing the Limit·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In the early Eighties, Andy King, the coach of the Seawolves, a swim club in Danville, California, instructed Debra Denithorne, aged twelve, to do doubles — to practice in the morning and the afternoon. King told Denithorne’s parents that he saw in her the potential to receive a college scholarship, and even to compete in the Olympics. Tall swimmers have an advantage in the water, and by the time Denithorne turned thirteen, she was five foot eight. She dropped soccer and a religious group to spend more time at the pool.

Illustration by Shonagh Rae
Article
Bumpy Ride·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

One sunny winter afternoon in western Michigan, I took a ride with Leon Slater, a slight sixty-four-year-old man with a neatly trimmed white beard and intense eyes behind his spectacles. He wore a faded blue baseball cap, so formed to his head that it seemed he slept with it on. Brickyard Road, the street in front of Slater’s home, was a mess of soupy dirt and water-filled craters. The muffler of his mud-splattered maroon pickup was loose, and exhaust fumes choked the cab. He gripped the wheel with hands leathery not from age but from decades moving earth with big machines for a living. What followed was a tooth-jarring tour of Muskegon County’s rural roads, which looked as though they’d been carpet-bombed.

Photograph by David Emitt Adams
Article
Bad Dog·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Abby was a breech birth but in the thirty-one years since then most everything has been pretty smooth. Sweet kid, not a lot of trouble. None of them were. Jack and Stevie set a good example, and she followed. Top grades, all the way through. Got on well with others but took her share of meanness here and there, so she stayed thoughtful and kind. There were a few curfew or partying things and some boys before she was ready, and there was one time on a school trip to Chicago that she and some other kids got caught smoking crack cocaine, but that was so weird it almost proved the rule. No big hiccups, master’s in ecology, good state job that lets her do half time but keep benefits while Rose is little.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter

Tons of invasive carp that the Australian government plans to eradicate by giving them herpes:

1,137,000

Contact lenses change the microbiome of the eye such that it resembles skin.

A reporter asked Trump about a lunch the president was said to have shared the previous day with his secretary of state, Trump said the reporter was “behind the times” and that the lunch had occurred the previous week, and the White House confirmed that the lunch had in fact occurred the previous day.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Report — From the June 2013 issue

How to Make Your Own AR-15

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

Subscribe Today