Weekly Review — September 7, 2016, 11:33 am

Weekly Review

North Korea fires three ballistic missiles toward the Sea of Japan, millions of honeybees die in South Carolina, and JetBlue puts an unaccompanied minor on the wrong flight

HarpersMagazine-1853-12-bootsRepublican presidential candidate Donald Trump met with Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto in Mexico City to discuss strengthening U.S.–Mexico relations, and then gave a speech to his supporters in Arizona in which he proposed “ideological certification” for immigrants seeking citizenship.[1][2][3] President Obama said that San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was “exercising his constitutional right” to protest police brutality when he refused to stand for the national anthem, and Georgetown University said it would attempt to make amends for having sold 272 slaves in 1838 by issuing a formal apology, giving preferred admission to descendants of the university’s slaves, building a memorial, and establishing an institute for the study of slavery.[4][5][6] A recent study showed that women ask for raises as often as men but receive them less, and Brazil’s senate voted 61 to 20 to remove former president Dilma Rousseff from office for allegedly manipulating the federal budget to conceal the country’s economic problems. “You never fit into the cute little dresses,” said Regina Sousa, a Worker’s Party senator and Rousseff supporter, “designed by the conservative elite.”[7][8][9]

North Korea fired three ballistic missiles toward the Sea of Japan.[10] JetBlue put an unaccompanied five-year-old boy on the wrong plane, sending him to Boston instead of New York; the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying a satellite leased by Facebook exploded on the launchpad in Cape Canaveral; and police in Florida arrested a man who posted his own “Wanted of the Week” mugshot on Facebook.[11][12][13] A two-year-old girl was cited for littering by the Washington, D.C., Department of Public Works, a public library in Alabama announced plans to enforce jail sentences for overdue books, and convicted rapist Brock Turner was released from prison after serving three months of his six-month sentence.[14][15][16] Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence announced that he will release his tax returns, the F.B.I. released documents related to the criminal investigation of presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, police in Pasadena, California, arrested a woman who was caught with 200 pieces of possibly stolen mail during a traffic stop, and police in New York City arrested a postal worker for throwing away mail on Fridays so he could leave work early.[17][18][19][20]

The F.D.A. banned the sale of soaps containing certain antibacterial chemicals, millions of honeybees in South Carolina were killed unintentionally by an aerial insecticide intended to combat Zika-transmitting mosquitoes, and a British man won the Scrabble world title with the eight-letter, 176-point word “braconid,” a type of parasitoid wasp.[21][22][23] A jury awarded $507,000 to a woman in St. Louis County, Missouri, who has had a hypodermic needle stuck in her back for seven years, a man in Ohio accidentally shot himself while under the influence of nitrous oxide at his dentist’s office, cocaine worth 50 million euros was discovered at a French Coca-Cola plant, and an 11-year-old Louisiana boy found a bag of methamphetamine in a video game he purchased from GameStop.[24][25][26][27] A magnitude-5.6 earthquake struck Oklahoma, and the New York City Department of Buildings discovered that a man in the West Village had disguised an illegal excavation on his property with fake grass and patio furniture. “The case shows the depths to which bad actors will sink,” said the Department of Buildings.[28][29]

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