Weekly Review — September 7, 2016, 11:33 am

Weekly Review

North Korea fires three ballistic missiles toward the Sea of Japan, millions of honeybees die in South Carolina, and JetBlue puts an unaccompanied minor on the wrong flight

HarpersMagazine-1853-12-bootsRepublican presidential candidate Donald Trump met with Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto in Mexico City to discuss strengthening U.S.–Mexico relations, and then gave a speech to his supporters in Arizona in which he proposed “ideological certification” for immigrants seeking citizenship.[1][2][3] President Obama said that San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was “exercising his constitutional right” to protest police brutality when he refused to stand for the national anthem, and Georgetown University said it would attempt to make amends for having sold 272 slaves in 1838 by issuing a formal apology, giving preferred admission to descendants of the university’s slaves, building a memorial, and establishing an institute for the study of slavery.[4][5][6] A recent study showed that women ask for raises as often as men but receive them less, and Brazil’s senate voted 61 to 20 to remove former president Dilma Rousseff from office for allegedly manipulating the federal budget to conceal the country’s economic problems. “You never fit into the cute little dresses,” said Regina Sousa, a Worker’s Party senator and Rousseff supporter, “designed by the conservative elite.”[7][8][9]

North Korea fired three ballistic missiles toward the Sea of Japan.[10] JetBlue put an unaccompanied five-year-old boy on the wrong plane, sending him to Boston instead of New York; the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying a satellite leased by Facebook exploded on the launchpad in Cape Canaveral; and police in Florida arrested a man who posted his own “Wanted of the Week” mugshot on Facebook.[11][12][13] A two-year-old girl was cited for littering by the Washington, D.C., Department of Public Works, a public library in Alabama announced plans to enforce jail sentences for overdue books, and convicted rapist Brock Turner was released from prison after serving three months of his six-month sentence.[14][15][16] Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence announced that he will release his tax returns, the F.B.I. released documents related to the criminal investigation of presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, police in Pasadena, California, arrested a woman who was caught with 200 pieces of possibly stolen mail during a traffic stop, and police in New York City arrested a postal worker for throwing away mail on Fridays so he could leave work early.[17][18][19][20]

The F.D.A. banned the sale of soaps containing certain antibacterial chemicals, millions of honeybees in South Carolina were killed unintentionally by an aerial insecticide intended to combat Zika-transmitting mosquitoes, and a British man won the Scrabble world title with the eight-letter, 176-point word “braconid,” a type of parasitoid wasp.[21][22][23] A jury awarded $507,000 to a woman in St. Louis County, Missouri, who has had a hypodermic needle stuck in her back for seven years, a man in Ohio accidentally shot himself while under the influence of nitrous oxide at his dentist’s office, cocaine worth 50 million euros was discovered at a French Coca-Cola plant, and an 11-year-old Louisiana boy found a bag of methamphetamine in a video game he purchased from GameStop.[24][25][26][27] A magnitude-5.6 earthquake struck Oklahoma, and the New York City Department of Buildings discovered that a man in the West Village had disguised an illegal excavation on his property with fake grass and patio furniture. “The case shows the depths to which bad actors will sink,” said the Department of Buildings.[28][29]

Read the Weekly Review in the Harper’s Magazine app, or sign up to have it delivered to your inbox.

Share
Single Page

More from Marisa Nakasone:

Weekly Review August 10, 2016, 11:44 am

Weekly Review

A bomb blast in a hospital in Quetta kills at least 70 people, landslides in Mexico kill 40 people, and a group of monkeys in Kuala Lumpur steal confidential documents from a mailman

Weekly Review March 8, 2016, 1:04 pm

Weekly Review

North Korea threatens to launch a nuclear strike on the United States, the search term “move to Canada” spikes on Google, and a dog crashes a semi-tractor.

Get access to 169 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

August 2019

The Last Frontier

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Play with No End

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Call of the Drums

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Brutal from the Beginning

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Alps

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
The Last Frontier·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The San Luis Valley in southern Colorado still looks much as it did one hundred, or even two hundred, years ago. Blanca Peak, at 14,345 feet the fourth-highest summit in the Rockies, overlooks a vast openness. Blanca, named for the snow that covers its summit most of the year, is visible from almost everywhere in the valley and is considered sacred by the Navajo. The range that Blanca presides over, the Sangre de Cristo, forms the valley’s eastern side. Nestled up against the range just north of Blanca is Great Sand Dunes National Park. The park is an amazement: winds from the west and southwest lift grains of sand from the grasses and sagebrush of the valley and deposit the finest ones, creating gigantic dunes. You can climb up these dunes and run back down, as I did as a child on a family road trip and I repeated with my own children fifteen years ago. The valley tapers to a close down in New Mexico, a little north of Taos. It is not hard to picture the indigenous people who carved inscriptions into rocks near the rivers, or the Hispanic people who established Colorado’s oldest town, San Luis, and a still-working system of communal irrigation in the southeastern corner, or a pioneer wagon train. (Feral horses still roam, as do pronghorn antelope and the occasional mountain lion.)

Article
A Play with No End·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

When I caught up with the Gilets Jaunes on March 2, near the Jardin du Ranelagh, they were moving in such a mass through the streets that all traffic had come to a halt. The residents of Passy, one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Paris, stood agape and apart and afraid. Many of the shops and businesses along the route of the march, which that day crossed seven and a half miles of the city, were shuttered for the occasion, the proprietors fearful of the volatile crowd, who mostly hailed from outside Paris and were considered a rabble of invaders.

Article
The Call of the Drums·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Great Kurultáj, an event held annually outside the town of Bugac, Hungary, is billed as both the “Tribal Assembly of the Hun-­Turkic Nations” and “Europe’s Largest Equestrian Event.” When I arrived last August, I was fittingly greeted by a variety of riders on horseback: some dressed as Huns, others as Parthian cavalrymen, Scythian archers, Magyar warriors, csikós cowboys, and betyár bandits. In total there were representatives from twenty-­seven “tribes,” all members of the “Hun-­Turkic” fraternity. The festival’s entrance was marked by a sixty-­foot-­tall portrait of Attila himself, wielding an immense broadsword and standing in front of what was either a bonfire or a sky illuminated by the baleful glow of war. He sported a goatee in the style of Steven Seagal and, shorn of his war braids and helmet, might have been someone you could find in a Budapest cellar bar. A slight smirk suggested that great mirth and great violence together mingled in his soul.

Article
Brutal from the Beginning·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Celebrity sightings are a familiar feature of the modern N.B.A., but this year’s playoffs included an appearance unusual even by the standards of America’s most star-­friendly sports league. A few minutes into the first game of the Western Conference semifinals, between the Golden State Warriors and the Houston ­Rockets—the season’s hottest ticket, featuring the reigning M.V.P. on one side and the reigning league champions on the other—­President Paul Kagame of Rwanda arrived with an entourage of about a dozen people, creating what the sports website The Undefeated called “a scene reminiscent of the fashionably late arrivals of Prince, Jay-­Z, Beyoncé and Rihanna.”

Article
The Alps·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Toyota HiAce with piebald paneling, singing suspension, and a reg from the last millennium rolled into the parking lot of the Swinford Gaels football club late on a Friday evening. The HiAce belonged to Rory Hughes, the eldest of the three brothers known as the Alps, and the Alps traveled everywhere together in it. The three stepped out and with a decisive slam of the van’s side door moved off across the moonscape of the parking lot in the order of their conceptions, Rory on point, the middle brother, Eustace, close behind, and the youngest, ­Bimbo, in dawdling tow.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

“What’s the point?” said Senator Tim Scott, who is paid at least $174,000 per year as an elected official, when asked whether he had read the Mueller report.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today