Weekly Review — October 11, 2016, 6:02 pm

Weekly Review

Hurricane Matthew kills more than 1,000 people in Haiti, Donald Trump attempts to apologize for bragging that he grabs women by their genitals, and scientists conclude humans will never live past 125.

HarpersMagazine-1853-12-bootsA video emerged in which Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump bragged about being able to “grab them by the pussy,” referring to women, without consequence because he is a celebrity.[1] “I’ve never said I am a perfect person,” Trump said in a video response.[2] Speaker of the House Paul Ryan uninvited Trump to a campaign event in his home state of Wisconsin, and Trump held a surprise news conference featuring three women who had previously accused former president Bill Clinton of either sexual assault or harassment, along with a rape victim whose attacker was a former court-appointed client of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.[3][4] Hours later, during the second presidential debate, the first ever to be aired on Iranian television, Trump announced that should he become president he would appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton’s use of a private email server while Secretary of State.[5][6] Excerpts of paid speeches that Clinton delivered to Wall Street executives but refused to make public were uploaded anonymously to WikiLeaks, including comments about the need for politicians to have “both a public and a private position.”[7] The White House accused Russia of using cyber attacks in an attempt to interfere in the presidential election, and U.K. ministers were banned from wearing Apple Watches in cabinet meetings over fears that the devices’ microphones could be used by Russian hackers to eavesdrop.[8][9] Geologists in Russia reported that the disputed Crimean Peninsula, annexed from Ukraine in 2014, is moving toward their country at a rate of 2.9 millimeters per year, and will reach the mainland in 1.5 million years.[10]

Russian president Vladimir Putin, who turned 64, received 450 birthday roses from his country’s parliament and was awarded a Venezuelan peace prize created in honor of former president Hugo Chávez.[11][12] Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end the decades-long conflict with a leftist rebel group, five days after his proposed peace deal was rejected in a national referendum.[13] Civil War–era cannonballs washed up on a South Carolina beach in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, a category-four storm that left 1.2 million people without power and killed 22 residents of the southeastern United States.[14][15] The hurricane killed more than 1,000 people in Haiti, and a U.S. meteorologist apologized for saying that hungry children eating trees was one of the causes of the island nation’s deforestation.[16][17] Saudi Arabia said it “regretted” but did not take blame for an air strike in Yemen that killed 142 funeral attendees, South Sudanese rebels killed 21 civilians in an ambush on several trucks, and Israel refused to guarantee that Irish passports would not be used by the Israeli secret service in future assassination attempts.[18][19][20] The value of the British pound dropped 6.1 percent against the dollar in just two minutes, and vending machines in Australia rejected new five-dollar notes designed to thwart counterfeiters.[21][22] A Syrian refugee suspected of planning a terrorist attack in Germany was captured by fellow Syrians, who invited him back to their apartment, tied him up, and alerted the police through social media.[23] The Islamic State’s Central Fatwa Committee issued a decree prohibiting the breeding of cats indoors.[24]

Oklahoma governor Mary Fallin announced that she would amend the executive proclamation that created Oilfield Prayer Day, inviting people of all faiths, not just Christians, to pray for the oil and natural-gas industries.[25] The Shiyan Lake Ecologic Park in China unveiled its “exciting and adventurous” glass-walled bathrooms, and a public restroom in Virginia was consumed by a sinkhole.[26][27] Officials in Indiana asked motorists for heightened caution during deer-mating season, and snake catchers in Australia observed a rare snake orgy in an empty pool.[28][29] In Germany, the seven-year hunt for the person responsible for slashing inflatable backyard pools ended with the arrest of a 27-year-old man, whose apartment also contained multiple inflatable mattresses. “We cannot rule out that the man has some kind of fetish,” said a police spokesman.[30] A Dutch tourist was sentenced to three months of hard labor in Myanmar after unplugging an amplifier that was broadcasting Buddhist chants because it was disrupting his sleep, and nine Australians were deported from Malaysia for publicly stripping down to their underwear, which bore the country’s national flag.[31][32] A woman suffering from Rapunzel syndrome had a four-by-six-inch ball of her own hair cut out of her stomach.[33] The world’s oldest living man, a Holocaust survivor, celebrated his bar mitzvah at age 113, and scientists concluded that humans will never live past 125. “At some point,” said one of the researchers, “everything goes wrong.”[34][35]

Read the Weekly Review in the Harper’s Magazine app, or sign up to have it delivered to your inbox.

Share
Single Page

More from Matthew Hickey:

Weekly Review May 22, 2018, 11:59 am

Weekly Review

A teenager kills ten people at a school in Texas, 31 Chilean bishops offer to resign, and the CDC warns against drinking the water in hotel pools

Weekly Review April 12, 2017, 12:24 pm

Weekly Review

Trump launches a missile strike in Syria, Russia declares Jehovah’s Witnesses an extremest organization, and human flesh is found not to be very nutritious

Weekly Review February 15, 2017, 2:57 pm

Weekly Review

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns, U.S. congressman Dana Rohrabacher announces that Macedonia is not a country, and White House press briefings draw more viewers than The Bold and the Beautiful

Get access to 168 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

April 2019

Works of Mercy

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Destined for Export·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Five years ago, Jean-Sebastien Hertsens Zune went looking for his parents. He already had one set, a Belgian church organist and his wife, who adopted him as a baby from Guatemala and later moved the family to France. But he wanted to find his birth mother and father. When Zune was a teenager, his Belgian parents gave him his adoption file, holding back only receipts showing how much the process had cost. Most people pay little attention to their birth certificates, but for adoptees, these documents, along with notes about their relinquishment, tell an often patchy origin story.

Post
Nowhere Left to Go·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“I can’t take chances with my life.”

Article
Like This or Die·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Alex and Wendy love culture. It’s how they spend their free time. It’s what they talk about at dinner parties. When they go jogging or to the gym, they listen to podcasts on their phones. On Sunday nights they watch their favorite new shows. They go to the movies sometimes, but they were bummed out when ­MoviePass went south, so now they mostly stream things. They belong to book clubs that meet every couple of weeks. Alex and Wendy work hard at their jobs, but they always have a bit of time to check their feeds at work. What’s in their feeds? Their feeds tell them about culture. Their feeds are a form of comfort. Their feeds explain things to them that they already understand. Their feeds tell them that everyone else is watching, reading, listening to the same things. Their feeds tell them about the people who make their culture, people who aren’t so different from them, just maybe a bit more glistening. Alex and Wendy’s feeds assure them that they aren’t lonely. Their feeds give them permission to like what they already like. Their feeds let them know that their culture is winning.

Article
Whisperings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Once, in an exuberant state, feeling filled with the muse, I told another writer: When I write, I know everything. Everything about the characters? she asked. No, I said, everything about the world, the universe. Every. Fucking. Thing. I was being preposterous, of course, but I was also trying to explain the feeling I got, deep inside writing a first draft, that I was listening and receiving, listening some more and receiving, from a place that was far enough away from my daily life, from all of my reading, from everything.

Article
Setting the World to Rights·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

All his life he lived on hatred.

He was a solitary man who hoarded gloom. At night a thick smell filled his bachelor’s room on the edge of the kibbutz. His sunken, severe eyes saw shapes in the dark. The hater and his hatred fed on each other. So it has ever been. A solitary, huddled man, if he does not shed tears or play the violin, if he does not fasten his claws in other people, experiences over the years a constantly mounting pressure, until he faces a choice between lunacy and suicide. And those who live around him breathe a sigh of relief.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

In California, a 78-year-old patient and his family were informed that he would die within days from a doctor who was communicating via video call on a screen mounted to a robot on wheels.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today