Weekly Review — October 18, 2016, 3:59 pm

Weekly Review

Donald Trump is accused of sexual assault, a G.O.P. office is firebombed, and a man saves a dog from an imaginary fire

WeeklyReviewJK-captionThe American Psychological Association found that more than half of Americans now identify the 2016 presidential election as a source of stress in their lives.[1] It was revealed in leaked emails allegedly stolen by the Russian government that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told a trade union that she wanted “to defend fracking under the right circumstances” and that environmental activists needed to “get a life.”[2] Campaign staffers for her Republican opponent, Donald Trump, told reporters that last year he had blocked them from investigating whether there was anything incriminating in his past.[3] Accusations surfaced that Trump had kissed a former Miss USA contestant, a makeup artist, and a Trump Tower receptionist without their consent; groped a People magazine reporter, a former contestant on his television show, a stranger he was sitting next to at a nightclub, and a stranger sitting next to him in first class on a flight; told a group of 14-year-old girls he would be dating them in “a couple of years”; and entered the dressing rooms of Miss Teen USA contestants while they were changing.[4] Trump denied the allegations, explaining to a crowd of supporters that one of the accusers “would not be my first choice,” that he “wasn’t impressed” by Clinton’s body, that she was on drugs during the second presidential debate, and that the allegations of sexual assault were a “total setup” by the New York Times. “Carlos Slim,” said Trump, referring to the paper’s largest shareholder, “comes from Mexico.”[5][6][7][8] The value of the peso rose to its highest level in nearly a month.[9]

In North Korea, a missile capable of striking U.S. bases overseas blew up immediately after a test launch, and in North Carolina, a G.O.P. headquarters was firebombed.[10][11] U.S. Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg called NFL players’ protest against police violence and systemic racism “really dumb,” and a man in Florida was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the attempted murder of George Zimmerman, who in 2012 shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager.[12][13] A judge in New Mexico declared a mistrial in the proceedings against the two police officers who killed James Boyd, an unarmed homeless man they had opened fire on after they attacked him with a stun grenade and a police dog.[14] A study of the Chicago Police Department found that some officers had more than 100 civilian complaints lodged against them, 20 times more than most of the city’s police accrue in their entire careers.[15] In Kansas, three men were charged with domestic terrorism for conspiring to detonate explosive-filled vehicles outside an apartment complex where Somali immigrants lived.[16] In Iraq, 4,000 Kurdish troops advanced on villages near Mosul, the first phase of the Iraqi government’s effort to reclaim its second-largest city from the Islamic State.[17] In Australia, an inventor developed a device to convert old potatoes into a sustainable substitute for cheese.[18]

Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari told reporters that his wife “belonged to” his kitchen.[19] A man in Canada was arrested for demanding sexual favors from a woman before he would return her lost wallet, the head of a craft-beer-kit company in China was reportedly requiring his female subordinates to line up and kiss him each morning, and a woman in Australia fell to her death from a 14th-floor balcony while trying to climb down the side of a building to escape her Tinder date.[20][21][22] A hospital in Utah billed a woman $39.35 for holding her own baby.[23] Investigators found that a surgeon in Massachusetts accidentally removed a kidney from the wrong patient, and a former mayor in Thailand was given a six-month prison sentence for kicking his doctor in the neck.[24][25] A driver in Newfoundland hit a moose while he was looking across the highway at the wreckage from a vehicle that had also hit a moose.[26] A 24-year-old woman in Florida asked her father for a ride to a job interview at a Fort Lauderdale bank, which she then robbed; a 43-year-old man in New York thought he rescued a dog from a house fire, which police informed him he had hallucinated while high on a mixture of LSD and cough syrup; and, in Houston, a 9-1-1 operator was arrested for hanging up on emergency calls. “Ain’t nobody got time for this,” she told a caller.[27][28][29]

Read the Weekly Review in the Harper’s Magazine app, or sign up to have it delivered to your inbox.

Share
Single Page

More from Joe Kloc:

Weekly Review May 9, 2018, 4:25 pm

Weekly Review

Essential consultants

Weekly Review May 2, 2018, 3:40 pm

Weekly Review

The Count and the Candyman

Weekly Review April 4, 2018, 5:16 pm

Weekly Review

Departments of Justice

Get access to 168 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

April 2019

Works of Mercy

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Destined for Export·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Five years ago, Jean-Sebastien Hertsens Zune went looking for his parents. He already had one set, a Belgian church organist and his wife, who adopted him as a baby from Guatemala and later moved the family to France. But he wanted to find his birth mother and father. When Zune was a teenager, his Belgian parents gave him his adoption file, holding back only receipts showing how much the process had cost. Most people pay little attention to their birth certificates, but for adoptees, these documents, along with notes about their relinquishment, tell an often patchy origin story.

Post
Nowhere Left to Go·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“I can’t take chances with my life.”

Article
Like This or Die·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Alex and Wendy love culture. It’s how they spend their free time. It’s what they talk about at dinner parties. When they go jogging or to the gym, they listen to podcasts on their phones. On Sunday nights they watch their favorite new shows. They go to the movies sometimes, but they were bummed out when ­MoviePass went south, so now they mostly stream things. They belong to book clubs that meet every couple of weeks. Alex and Wendy work hard at their jobs, but they always have a bit of time to check their feeds at work. What’s in their feeds? Their feeds tell them about culture. Their feeds are a form of comfort. Their feeds explain things to them that they already understand. Their feeds tell them that everyone else is watching, reading, listening to the same things. Their feeds tell them about the people who make their culture, people who aren’t so different from them, just maybe a bit more glistening. Alex and Wendy’s feeds assure them that they aren’t lonely. Their feeds give them permission to like what they already like. Their feeds let them know that their culture is winning.

Article
Whisperings·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Once, in an exuberant state, feeling filled with the muse, I told another writer: When I write, I know everything. Everything about the characters? she asked. No, I said, everything about the world, the universe. Every. Fucking. Thing. I was being preposterous, of course, but I was also trying to explain the feeling I got, deep inside writing a first draft, that I was listening and receiving, listening some more and receiving, from a place that was far enough away from my daily life, from all of my reading, from everything.

Article
Setting the World to Rights·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

All his life he lived on hatred.

He was a solitary man who hoarded gloom. At night a thick smell filled his bachelor’s room on the edge of the kibbutz. His sunken, severe eyes saw shapes in the dark. The hater and his hatred fed on each other. So it has ever been. A solitary, huddled man, if he does not shed tears or play the violin, if he does not fasten his claws in other people, experiences over the years a constantly mounting pressure, until he faces a choice between lunacy and suicide. And those who live around him breathe a sigh of relief.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

In California, a 78-year-old patient and his family were informed that he would die within days from a doctor who was communicating via video call on a screen mounted to a robot on wheels.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today