Weekly Review — November 8, 2016, 11:49 am

Weekly Review

The Ku Klux Klan endorses Donald Trump, the FBI says Hillary Clinton won’t be prosecuted, and Americans pick their next president

WeeklyAvatar-SM.pngU.S. citizens headed to the polls to decide whether the former secretary of state, New York senator, and first lady Hillary Clinton or the four-times-bankrupt real-estate developer Donald Trump would become the country’s 45th president.[1] Days before the election, FBI director James Comey said he saw no reason to change the conclusion he reached in July that Clinton should not face charges for her use of a private email server while secretary of state.[2] The announcement buoyed European stock markets but drew criticism from both political parties. “Maybe he’s not in the right job,” House minority leader Nancy Pelosi said of Comey, who has more than six years and nine months left in his term.[3][4][5] At a rally in Reno, Nevada, Trump was rushed offstage after a protester held up a “Republicans Against Trump” sign that was mistaken for a gun.[6] Aides took away Trump’s Twitter privileges, the Ku Klux Klan’s official newspaper endorsed him, and his eldest daughter asked that her participation in a campaign commercial targeted toward suburban women be kept out of news releases so that it doesn’t harm her business ventures.[7][8][9] The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces began an offensive to retake Raqqa from the Islamic State, and Iraqi forces entered eastern neighborhoods of Mosul.[10][11] It was reported that state television in Iran was broadcasting the U.S. presidential debates as anti-American propaganda. “We only need to sit back,” said an Iranian analyst.[12]

At New York’s Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, where students have correctly predicted the outcome of every presidential race since 1968, Hillary Clinton won a mock election with 52 percent of the vote.[13] Parents in Spain asked their children’s teachers not to assign homework, and more than 1,800 public primary schools were closed in New Delhi, where exposure to air pollution was said to be equivalent to smoking 40 cigarettes a day.[14][15] Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that middle-school students are now just as likely to die from suicide as from traffic accidents.[16] Poor North Koreans were reported to be hanging scrolls that read “Spirit of Self-Destruction” in their elderly parents’ bedrooms, urging them to kill themselves.[17] Samsung issued a recall on exploding washing machines.[18] Protesters in Seoul called for South Korean president Park Geun-hye to resign after it was revealed that she had been receiving secret counsel from the daughter of an alleged cult leader.[19][20] A 31-year-old fishmonger in Morocco was crushed by a garbage truck days before the country hosted global climate-change talks, and a park ranger in Washington, D.C., shot himself in the foot while trying to fend off a raccoon.[21][22][23] Two teenage girls found hugging and kissing on a rooftop in Marrakesh were beaten by their families and charged with “licentious or unnatural acts,” and the Vatican condemned an Italian priest who said recent earthquakes were divine punishment for gay civil unions.[24][25] Police in Shenzhen, China, punished traffic violators by making them sit in front of a car with its high beams on, and a Texas police officer was fired for giving a homeless man a sandwich filled with feces.[26][27]

The Canadian military investigated acoustic anomalies that were said to be distressing bowhead whales and ringed seals in the Fury and Hecla Strait.[28] Researchers in Hawaii reported using a hydrophone and an accelerometer to detect humpback-whale vibrations from more than 650 feet away.[29] In Cheboksary, Russia, a 63-year-old man was arrested for murdering a friend who had insulted his accordion skills.[30] A squirrel injured three people in the activity room of a Florida retirement home, and vampire bats were found to be feeding on pig blood in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil.[31][32] A Mississippi man who had an affair was forced by his wife to chew and swallow his severed genitals, and a Swiss café was reported to be considering hiring sex robots.[33][34] Neiman Marcus was selling four 12-ounce servings of frozen prepared collard greens for $66, plus shipping, and a Tennessee Eagle Scout who was suspended for buying an extra chicken nugget at lunch got his punishment overturned.[35][36] Students at a South Carolina elementary school were suspended for possession of a mixture of Kool-Aid powder and sugar known as happy crack, and, in Buffalo, a 62-year-old recovering heroin addict sued to stop the presidential election. “I was just waiting for an okay,” she said, “from God.”[37][38]

Share
Single Page

More from Stephanie McFeeters:

Response March 7, 2017, 6:51 pm

A Feminism for the Masses

Four women make the case for a strike

Weekly Review December 30, 2016, 3:50 pm

Weekly Review

The U.N. Security Council condemns the construction of Israeli settlements in the West Bank, an ordained Pagan priest receives permission to wear goat horns in his driver’s license photo, and snow falls in the Saharan town of Ain Sefra for the first time in 40 years.

Weekly Review September 20, 2016, 12:34 pm

Weekly Review

A homemade bomb explodes under a dumpster in New York City, Donald Trump admits U.S. president Barack Obama was born in America, and a fertility doctor in Indiana is accused of artificially inseminating his patients with his own sperm

Get access to 168 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

November 2018

The Tragedy of Ted Cruz

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Rebirth of a Nation

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Rebirth of a Nation·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Donald Trump’s presidency signals a profound but inchoate realignment of American politics. On the one hand, his administration may represent the consolidation of minority control by a Republican-dominated Senate under the leadership of a president who came to office after losing the popular vote by almost 3 million ballots. Such an imbalance of power could lead to a second civil war—indeed, the nation’s first and only great fraternal conflagration was sparked off in part for precisely this reason. On the other hand, Trump’s reign may be merely an interregnum, in which the old white power structure of the Republican Party is dying and a new oppositional coalition struggles to be born.

Illustration by Taylor Callery (detail)
Article
Blood Money·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Over the past three years, the city of South Tucson, Arizona, a largely Latino enclave nestled inside metropolitan Tucson, came close to abolishing its fire and police departments. It did sell off the library and cut back fire-truck crews from four to three people—whereupon two thirds of the fire department quit—and slashed the police force to just sixteen employees. “We’re a small city, just one square mile, surrounded by a larger city,” the finance director, Lourdes Aguirre, explained to me. “We have small-town dollars and big-city problems.”

Illustration by John Ritter (detail)
Article
The Tragedy of Ted Cruz·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

When I saw Ted Cruz speak, in early August, it was at Underwood’s Cafeteria in Brownwood. He was on a weeklong swing through rural central Texas, hitting small towns and military bases that ensured him friendly, if not always entirely enthusiastic, crowds. In Brownwood, some in the audience of two hundred were still nibbling on peach cobbler as Cruz began with an anecdote about his win in a charity basketball game against ABC’s late-night host Jimmy Kimmel. They rewarded him with smug chuckles when he pointed out that “Hollywood celebrities” would be hurting over the defeat “for the next fifty years.” His pitch for votes was still an off-the-rack Tea Party platform, complete with warnings about the menace of creeping progressivism, delivered at a slightly mechanical pace but with lots of punch. The woman next to me remarked, “This is the fire in the gut! Like he had the first time!” referring to Cruz’s successful long-shot run in the 2011 Texas Republican Senate primary. And it’s true—the speech was exactly like one Cruz would have delivered in 2011, right down to one specific detail: he never mentioned Donald Trump by name.

Cruz recited almost verbatim the same things Trump lists as the administration’s accomplishments: the new tax legislation, reduced African-American unemployment, repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate, and Neil Gorsuch’s appointment to the Supreme Court. But, in a mirror image of those in the #Resistance who refuse to ennoble Trump with the title “president,” Cruz only called him that.

Photograph of Ted Cruz © Ben Helton (detail)
Article
Wrong Object·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

H

e is a nondescript man.

I’d never used that adjective about a client. Not until this one. My seventeenth. He’d requested an evening time and came Tuesdays at six-thirty. For months he didn’t tell me what he did.

The first session I said what I often said to begin: How can I help you?

I still think of what I do as a helping profession. And I liked the way the phrase echoed down my years; in my first job I’d been a salesgirl at a department store counter.

I want to work on my marriage, he said. I’m the problem.

His complaint was familiar. But I preferred a self-critical patient to a blamer.

It’s me, he said. My wife is a thoroughly good person.

Yawn, I thought, but said, Tell me more.

I don’t feel what I should for her.

What do you feel?

Photograph © Joseph S. Giacalone (detail)

Chances an American who voted for Ross Perot in 1992 can no longer recall having done so:

1 in 2

People tend to believe that God believes what they believe.

Nikki Haley resigns; Jamal Khashoggi murdered; Kanye visits the White House

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

Illustration by Stan Fellows

Illustration by Stan Fellows

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today