Weekly Review — November 1, 2016, 5:56 pm

Weekly Review

The FBI continues its investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails, a Russian weapons manufacturer unveils a missile capable of destroying Texas, and a chimpanzee in North Korea smokes a pack of cigarettes 

the magnificent bird of paradise.

the magnificent bird of paradise.

More than 140 Native Americans and their supporters were arrested near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota during ongoing protests against the proposed Dakota Access pipeline, which will transport more than 450,000 barrels of crude a day from the state’s northwestern region to Patoka, Illinois.[1][2] Protesters threw logs and feces at police officers, who shot rubber bullets at their horses.[3] Seven armed antigovernment militiamen who occupied Malheur National Wildlife Refuge earlier this year were acquitted of firearm possession in a federal facility and conspiracy to impede federal workers, and at least 1,000 children who were evicted from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais, France, were reportedly living in nearby shipping containers. “Mission accomplished,” said the prefect of the region.[4][5] FBI director James Comey announced that the agency would continue its investigation of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server after potentially relevant emails were found on devices owned by former congressman Anthony Weiner, who is under investigation for sending lewd text messages to an underage girl.[6][7] Senate minority leader Harry Reid accused Comey of breaking the law by making the announcement so close to the election, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump praised the decision. “The system might not be as rigged as I thought,” he said.[8][9] It was reported that as many as 900 Islamic State fighters were killed in Mosul, Iraq, during Iraqi-led efforts to reclaim control of the city; 60 people were killed in an attack on a police academy in Quetta, Pakistan; and at least 26 people, including children, were killed at a school in northwestern Syria when it was struck by air raids linked to Russia.[10][11][12] A Russian missile company unveiled the RS-28, a 100-ton intercontinental ballistic rocket with a 6,835-mile range nicknamed Satan 2, which they claimed could “wipe out parts of the earth the size of Texas or France.”[13][14]

The World Meteorological Organization warned that 2016 could be the first time in 5 million years that carbon dioxide levels remained above 400 parts per million, scientists predicted that more than two thirds of the world’s wild animals could be gone by 2020, and a glaciologist in Antarctica died when he drove his snowmobile into a crevasse.[15][16][17] In Amsterdam, inventors unveiled a vacuum cleaner that they claimed could suck air from more than four miles above the earth’s surface and filter out fine particles, and a man in Portland, Maine, was arresting for obstructing traffic while dressed as an evergreen tree.[18][19] A man in Saudi Arabia filed for divorce two hours after his wedding when he learned that his wife had shared their wedding photos on Snapchat, and authorities in Chechnya began sending representatives to monitor weddings to ensure no “nontraditional” behavior, including firing guns and brides dancing, took place.[20][21] In Iceland, thousands of women left their jobs at 2:38 P.M., with 14 percent of their workday remaining, to protest the country’s 14 percent gender pay gap, and researchers reported that the gender gap in alcohol consumption is narrowing in younger generations.[22][23] The former personal sushi chef for North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said that Kim had bragged about drinking ten bottles of Bordeaux wine in one evening, and it was reported that a chimpanzee in Pyongyang Zoo, in the nation’s capital, smokes a pack of cigarettes per day.[24][25]

A 20-year-old woman in Texas was arrested after she rear-ended a police car while trying to take a topless selfie, a man in Arizona stopped to order food at an In-N-Out Burger drive-through window while being chased by police, and a 28-year-old man in Florida fell out of and then had his leg run over by his pickup truck on his way home from a strip club.[26][27][28] It was reported that the 531-foot-tall steeple of the tallest church in the world, in Ulm, Germany, is eroding because it is coated with urine and vomit, and the Catholic Church announced that scattering the ashes of a cremated person could give the appearance of nihilism.[29][30] Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said that he had promised God he would stop cursing while on a flight from Japan. “I heard a voice telling me to stop swearing,” he said, “or the plane will crash.”[31] Schools in at least nine states banned children from dressing up as clowns for Halloween, and it was reported that because of a number of threatening clown sightings around the world, McDonald’s would stop displaying Ronald McDonald in public.[32] Police in California arrested a man dressed as a “Psycho Teddy Bear” who was carrying two hunting knives, researchers from the American Chemical Society concluded that eating 262 pieces of “Fun Size” Halloween candy could be lethal, and parents in Oregon were advised to check their children’s Halloween candy for edible marijuana. “The candies,” said a toxicologist at the Oregon Poison Center, “could get mixed up.”[33][34][35]

Share
Single Page

More from Sharon J. Riley:

Weekly Review June 12, 2018, 11:56 am

Weekly Review

Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump meet at a former POW site, Jeff Sessions denies asylum to victims of domestic abuse and gang violence, and the National Sheriff Association announces a new initiative to protect pets

Weekly Review April 17, 2018, 2:23 pm

Weekly Review

Trump fires missiles at Syria, a former FBI director likens Trump to a Mafia boss, and New Yorkers mistake a racoon for a tiger

Weekly Review March 20, 2018, 1:38 pm

Weekly Review

Donald Trump says teachers should carry guns, a school resource officer mistakenly fires his gun at a middle school in Virginia, and the United States receives its worst-ever ranking on the World Happiness Report

Get access to 169 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

October 2019

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Secrets and Lies·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In 1973, when Barry Singer was a fifteen-year-old student at New York’s Yeshiva University High School for Boys, the vice principal, Rabbi George Finkelstein, stopped him in a stairwell. Claiming he wanted to check his tzitzit—the strings attached to Singer’s prayer shawl—Finkelstein, Singer says, pushed the boy over the third-floor banister, in full view of his classmates, and reached down his pants. “If he’s not wearing tzitzit,” Finkelstein told the surrounding children, “he’s going over the stairs!”

“He played it as a joke, but I was completely at his mercy,” Singer recalled. For the rest of his time at Yeshiva, Singer would often wear his tzitzit on the outside of his shirt—though this was regarded as rebellious—for fear that Finkelstein might find an excuse to assault him again.

Post
Seeking Asylum·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Out of sight on Leros, the island of the damned

Post
Poem for Harm·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Reflections on harm in language and the trouble with Whitman

Article
Good Bad Bad Good·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

About fifteen years ago, my roommate and I developed a classification system for TV and movies. Each title was slotted into one of four categories: Good-Good; Bad-Good; Good-Bad; Bad-Bad. The first qualifier was qualitative, while the second represented a high-low binary, the title’s aspiration toward capital-A Art or lack thereof.

Some taxonomies were inarguable. The O.C., a Fox series about California rich kids and their beautiful swimming pools, was delightfully Good-Bad. Paul Haggis’s heavy-handed morality play, Crash, which won the Oscar for Best Picture, was gallingly Bad-Good. The films of Francois Truffaut, Good-Good; the CBS sitcom Two and a Half Men, Bad-Bad.

Article
Life after Life·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

For time ylost, this know ye,
By no way may recovered be.
—Chaucer

I spent thirty-eight years in prison and have been a free man for just under two. After killing a man named Thomas Allen Fellowes in a drunken, drugged-up fistfight in 1980, when I was nineteen years old, I was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. Former California governor Jerry Brown commuted my sentence and I was released in 2017, five days before Christmas. The law in California, like in most states, grants the governor the right to alter sentences. After many years of advocating for the reformation of the prison system into one that encourages rehabilitation, I had my life restored to me.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

A solid-gold toilet named “America” was stolen from Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of Winston Churchill, in Oxfordshire, England.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today