Monthly Archives: September 2017

Oral History — September 27, 2017, 4:43 pm

After Shock

“The night of the earthquake I was by myself; I lived alone. I thought, like so many Chileans, that it was the end of the world. I thought, above all, about how I had no one to protect.”

Art, Monday Gallery — September 25, 2017, 12:04 pm

Drifting on a Memory

A painting by Yorgo Alexopoulos, whose exhibition Drifting on a Memory is on view this week at Gallery Wendi Norris, in San Francisco. Courtesy Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco

Weekly Review — September 22, 2017, 3:05 pm

Weekly Review

U.S. president Donald Trump, who has called the United Nations one of the world’s “most valuable institutions,” arrived at U.N. headquarters in New York to deliver his first speech to the General Assembly, then praised the international body for having increased the value of his nearby Trump World Tower, a 72-story residential building whose construction the United Nations had opposed. The U.N. secretary-general told Trump that “fiery talk” could lead to “fatal misunderstandings”; Trump said that Venezuela is “collapsing,” that Iran is a “murderous regime,” and that North Korea is on a “suicide mission” that might require him to “totally …

Editor's Note — September 18, 2017, 1:04 pm

Inside the October Issue

Marilynne Robinson, Andrew Cockburn, Ben Mauk, Elisabeth Zerofsky, Eileen Myles, and more…

Art, Monday Gallery — September 18, 2017, 12:08 pm

George, Paw Paw, WV

“George, Paw Paw, WV,” a photograph by Lisa Elmaleh, whose work is on view this week at the White Room Gallery, in Thomas, West Virginia. Photographs by Elmaleh from Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, can be viewed in “All Over This Land,” a Forum about local politics in the age of Trump in the October issue of Harper’s Magazine. Courtesy the artist. 

Weekly Review — September 15, 2017, 4:37 pm

Weekly Review

The Democratic leaders of Congress celebrated a verbal agreement made with U.S. president Donald Trump that would protect from deportation 800,000 undocumented U.S. residents known as Dreamers, Trump supporters burned Make America Great Again hats in protest, and an op-ed erroneously claiming that thousands of people in New Hampshire voted illegally in the 2016 presidential election was published by the vice chair of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, Kris Kobach, who argued as an undergraduate at Harvard University against efforts to divest from the apartheid government of South Africa while he was being mentored by a professor who …

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Illustration by Darrel Rees. Source photographs: Kim Jong-un © ITAR-TASS Photo Agency/Alamy Stock Photo; Donald Trump © Yuri Gripas/Reuters/Newscom

Acres of mirrors in Donald Trump’s Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City:

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"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

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