Weekly Review — March 5, 2019, 11:06 am

Weekly Review

Trump blamed the failure of the Hanoi summit on Cohen’s public testimony; a fight broke out in the West Virginia State Capitol building; a police officer accidentally shot himself in the chest while fleeing a rabid fox

Following an attack by a suicide bomber that left more than 40 Indian troops in Kashmir dead, an Indian airman, who said in a 2011 TV interview that a “bad attitude” was required to become a fighter pilot, was shot down over the disputed region, parachuted into Pakistani territory, tried to eat his documents, was beaten by a mob, and was then captured by Pakistani forces, who took him into custody, interrogated him, and filmed him drinking tea.1 2 3 After the pilot was released by Pakistan, Naxalites demonstrated for peace between the two countries in Kolkata.4 Iran’s foreign minister announced his resignation in a cryptic Instagram post but returned to the job two days later.5 In Hanoi, Vietnam, Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un held a second summit to discuss North Korean disarmament, but the US president abruptly ended negotiations without reaching an agreement; Russian officials confirmed that Kim will visit Moscow sometime in the future.6 7 8 Trump blamed the summit’s failure in part on the public testimony of Michael Cohen, his former lawyer, before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform; Cohen attested that Trump had told him, “You think I’m stupid? I wasn’t going to Vietnam.”9 10 Canada’s former justice minister and attorney general testified that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and others in his office had pressured her to halt a criminal case against the construction firm SNC-Lavalin, and Israel’s attorney general announced plans to indict Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is running for reelection, for bribery, fraud, and breach of trust, in three separate cases.11 12 “So have at it, go ahead, waste your money, waste your time, and go ahead and lose,” said Republican National Committee chair Ronna McDaniel in response to a question about potential Trump primary challengers.13 A black man became the director and president of a white-supremacist organization in the hopes of disbanding it.14 In Oakland, California, a private school discovered that donated paintings they had borrowed against for funding were fakes.15

The governor of Washington and the former governor of Colorado announced that they were running for president as Democrats.16 17 The first lady of Virginia has apologized for handing out raw cotton to black children during a tour of the governor’s mansion.18 A poster that hung in the West Virginia State Capitol as part of a “Republicans Take the Rotunda” event that juxtaposed a photograph of a plane hitting the World Trade Center accompanied by the text “never forget” – you said… with a photograph of Representative Ilhan Omar and the text i am the proof – you have forgotten caused a verbal and physical fight between Republican and Democratic lawmakers.19 A church in Springdale, Arkansas, denied that their sign, which read heaven has strict immigration laws, hell has open borders, was political.20 A Trump campaign adviser called Representative Omar “filth” and “rooted in anti-Semitism” during an interview, and it was revealed that Psy-Group, an Israeli intelligence firm, had investigated and smeared supporters of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement.21 22 In Arizona, a congressman who opposes the Green New Deal said that climate change wasn’t a problem because of photosynthesis, and the mayor of the town of Patagonia read an apology to a 12-year-old journalist who had been threatened with arrest by a police officer.23 24 The FDA has condemned the use of plasma transfusions from young people as a treatment for illness and aging.25

Walmart announced that it will replace greeters with “customer hosts,” who must be able to lift at least 25 pounds, climb ladders, and stand for long periods of time.26 An elderly tourist posing for a photograph on an iceberg floated out to sea and was rescued by a sea captain.27 A police officer in Ellenville, New York, accidentally shot himself in the chest while fleeing a rabid fox, and the police in Jordan, Minnesota, were called to check on a man standing outside in the cold and holding a pillow that was actually a cardboard cutout of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.28 29 The Utah House passed a bill allowing drivers to ignore red lights in “extremely low” traffic; the failure to yield accounts for approximately 12 percent of automotive fatalities in that state.30 31Violet Lucca

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