Weekly Review — May 14, 2019, 1:20 pm

Weekly Review

Donald Trump criticized Rashida Tlaib, then welcomed Viktor Orbán to the White House; Georgia banned abortions after six weeks; 46 million Australian bills were printed with a typo

During an interview, Representative Rashida Tlaib of Michigan remarked that the thought of her Palestinian ancestors giving up their homes and livelihoods to help Jews after the Holocaust gave her a “warm feeling,” which was roundly criticized by Donald Trump and other G.O.P. politicians as anti-Semitic.1 “She obviously has tremendous hatred of Israel and the Jewish people. Can you imagine what would happen if I ever said what she said, and says?” Trump tweeted; several hours later, the president welcomed Viktor Orbán, Hungary’s prime minister, who used the slogan “Let’s not allow Soros to have the last laugh!” on a campaign poster, to the White House.2 3 “You’re respected all over Europe. Probably like me a little bit controversial, but that’s okay. You’ve done a good job, and you’ve kept your country safe,” said Trump, whose tax information from 1985 to 1994, which showed losses of $1.17 billion and allowed for no deductions for charitable giving, was made public; in 1991, his loss was 1 percent of all losses declared by individual taxpayers that year.4 5 6  A survey reported that 1 in 15 borrowers considered suicide because of their student loan-debt; for the second month in a row, there were over 100,000 arrests at the U.S.–Mexico border; and the CDC reported that about 420 women die each year from preventable pregnancy complications.7 8 9 “Who am I to hold that against someone when they’ve turned their life around?” said Tennessee House Speaker Glen Casada, explaining his decision not to fire his chief of staff after it was revealed that, as recently as three years ago, he had sent text messages asking for oral sex from an intern, tried to have sex with a lobbyist, and said he’d try to have sex with another intern; Casada has not yet signed a bill, approved by the Tennessee Senate, that would require drivers to use a hands-free device for cell phones.10 11 Uber had the worst initial public offering in U.S. stock market history.13 Physicists found that gravitational waves leave more observable “memories” when passing through space than was previously thought.14

Outside of Argentina’s National Congress, a legislator and his aide were fatally shot in what local officials described as a “Mafia-style” hit, and Israel and Palestine agreed to a ceasefire so that Israel could host Eurovision.15 16 17 A Chicago judge used eyewitness testimony from a legally blind man to sentence a teenager to 76 years in prison.18 Representative John Becker of Ohio, who sponsored a bill that would ban nearly all forms of nontherapeutic abortion, incorrectly stated that ectopic pregnancies could be implanted into the uterus; Georgia passed a law that would imprison women who obtain an abortion after six weeks; and, following a procedural debate, the Alabama Senate postponed a vote on a proposal that would ban most abortions, including in cases of rape or incest.19 20 21 “As a mother, you know,” said a woman whose son’s death in a Florida Panhandle prison was revealed this week to have been potentially staged by guards to look like a suicide; the same report also detailed starvation, the beating of inmates, and the harassment of black employees, which included the dangling of nooses made from toilet paper in front of them.22 The United States is nearly drought-free for the first time in decades and is experiencing unprecedented levels of flooding.23 The only cemetery in Lares, Puerto Rico, which was damaged during Hurricane Maria, finally reopened.24 In Mongolia, a couple ate raw marmot and died of the plague.25

B-52 bombers traveled from Louisiana to Qatar as a warning to Iran, and the Army introduced new uniforms that closely resemble its World War II–era uniforms.26 27 Kendrick Castillo—a high school senior and a member of his school’s robotics team—was fatally shot while lunging at one of two gunmen who entered the school to kill their fellow students.28 In Milwaukee, a gun owner with a concealed-carry permit threatened to shoot people he was arguing with, tried to pull out his weapon, and, in the ensuing struggle, shot and killed himself.29 In a Bavarian hotel, three guests were shot with a crossbow.30 The Australian $50 note was printed with a typo on 46 million bills.31 In Florida, a judge ruled that a couple hoping to use CBD oil, alkaline water, and fresh food to cure their three-year-old of cancer must send their child to chemotherapy; a man pulled over for having a bumper sticker reading “I Eat Ass” says his rights were violated; and after being chased by a stolen Orange County sheriff’s vehicle, a different thief crashed into two cars and a house, and then fled the scene.32 33 34 An ad agency for the National Rifle Association, according to leaked documents, was billed over half a million dollars by NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre for, among other things, a nearly $40,000 shopping spree in Beverly Hills and $13,800 in rent for an intern.35Jacob Rosenberg

Share
Single Page

More from Harper’s Magazine:

Weekly Review July 16, 2019, 1:26 pm

Weekly Review

Pelosi vs. the squad; Trump vs. the squad; Alexander Acosta resigned

Podcast July 12, 2019, 10:22 am

The Hardest Music and the Softest Animals

Nell Zink discusses her latest novel, zines, and musical reverberation

Weekly Review July 10, 2019, 9:00 am

Weekly Review

The president spoke for 47 minutes at the Salute to America; a 17-year-old girl who licked the inside of a tub of Blue Bell ice cream at a Walmart and then put it back in the freezer was arrested; Lisa MacLeod apologized to the owner of the Ottawa Senators

Get access to 169 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

August 2019

The Last Frontier

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Play with No End

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Call of the Drums

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Brutal from the Beginning

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Alps

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
The Last Frontier·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The San Luis Valley in southern Colorado still looks much as it did one hundred, or even two hundred, years ago. Blanca Peak, at 14,345 feet the fourth-highest summit in the Rockies, overlooks a vast openness. Blanca, named for the snow that covers its summit most of the year, is visible from almost everywhere in the valley and is considered sacred by the Navajo. The range that Blanca presides over, the Sangre de Cristo, forms the valley’s eastern side. Nestled up against the range just north of Blanca is Great Sand Dunes National Park. The park is an amazement: winds from the west and southwest lift grains of sand from the grasses and sagebrush of the valley and deposit the finest ones, creating gigantic dunes. You can climb up these dunes and run back down, as I did as a child on a family road trip and I repeated with my own children fifteen years ago. The valley tapers to a close down in New Mexico, a little north of Taos. It is not hard to picture the indigenous people who carved inscriptions into rocks near the rivers, or the Hispanic people who established Colorado’s oldest town, San Luis, and a still-working system of communal irrigation in the southeastern corner, or a pioneer wagon train. (Feral horses still roam, as do pronghorn antelope and the occasional mountain lion.)

Article
A Play with No End·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

When I caught up with the Gilets Jaunes on March 2, near the Jardin du Ranelagh, they were moving in such a mass through the streets that all traffic had come to a halt. The residents of Passy, one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Paris, stood agape and apart and afraid. Many of the shops and businesses along the route of the march, which that day crossed seven and a half miles of the city, were shuttered for the occasion, the proprietors fearful of the volatile crowd, who mostly hailed from outside Paris and were considered a rabble of invaders.

Article
The Call of the Drums·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Great Kurultáj, an event held annually outside the town of Bugac, Hungary, is billed as both the “Tribal Assembly of the Hun-­Turkic Nations” and “Europe’s Largest Equestrian Event.” When I arrived last August, I was fittingly greeted by a variety of riders on horseback: some dressed as Huns, others as Parthian cavalrymen, Scythian archers, Magyar warriors, csikós cowboys, and betyár bandits. In total there were representatives from twenty-­seven “tribes,” all members of the “Hun-­Turkic” fraternity. The festival’s entrance was marked by a sixty-­foot-­tall portrait of Attila himself, wielding an immense broadsword and standing in front of what was either a bonfire or a sky illuminated by the baleful glow of war. He sported a goatee in the style of Steven Seagal and, shorn of his war braids and helmet, might have been someone you could find in a Budapest cellar bar. A slight smirk suggested that great mirth and great violence together mingled in his soul.

Article
Brutal from the Beginning·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Celebrity sightings are a familiar feature of the modern N.B.A., but this year’s playoffs included an appearance unusual even by the standards of America’s most star-­friendly sports league. A few minutes into the first game of the Western Conference semifinals, between the Golden State Warriors and the Houston ­Rockets—the season’s hottest ticket, featuring the reigning M.V.P. on one side and the reigning league champions on the other—­President Paul Kagame of Rwanda arrived with an entourage of about a dozen people, creating what the sports website The Undefeated called “a scene reminiscent of the fashionably late arrivals of Prince, Jay-­Z, Beyoncé and Rihanna.”

Article
The Alps·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Toyota HiAce with piebald paneling, singing suspension, and a reg from the last millennium rolled into the parking lot of the Swinford Gaels football club late on a Friday evening. The HiAce belonged to Rory Hughes, the eldest of the three brothers known as the Alps, and the Alps traveled everywhere together in it. The three stepped out and with a decisive slam of the van’s side door moved off across the moonscape of the parking lot in the order of their conceptions, Rory on point, the middle brother, Eustace, close behind, and the youngest, ­Bimbo, in dawdling tow.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

“What’s the point?” said Senator Tim Scott, who is paid at least $174,000 per year as an elected official, when asked whether he had read the Mueller report.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today