Weekly Review — July 2, 2019, 2:47 pm

Weekly Review

Nearly 300 migrant children were moved from a detention center in Clint, Texas; Trump becomes the first U.S. president to visit North Korea; Parisian swimming pools have extended their hours

Nearly 300 migrant children were moved from a detention center in Clint, Texas, after being held for almost a month without soap, clean clothes, or diapers; reports also described children waking up in the night, unable to sleep from hunger.1 2 In response, the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection stepped down and was replaced by Mark Morgan, a former Fox News contributor who once claimed that he could look into the eyes of a child and determine whether they were a future MS-13 member.3 4 “For God’s sake, they’re kids, man,” said Gabriel Acuña, who tried to visit a facility in Texas where people were not allowed to donate supplies.5 The Supreme Court disallowed a question asking about citizenship from being added to the 2020 Census and ruled that federal courts cannot strike down partisan gerrymandering done by state legislatures.6 7 Over the two nights of Democratic presidential debates, Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii corrected Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio after he stated that the Taliban flew planes into the World Trade Center; Marianne Williamson, the author of Healing the Soul of America, said that, on her first day as president, she would call New Zealand’s prime minister to tell her, “Girlfriend, you are so on”; and when discussing the death of Eric Logan, a 54-year-old black man who was shot by a white police officer who has a history of making racist remarks and did not have his body camera turned on during the incident, Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, said, “I’m not allowed to take sides until the investigation comes back… It’s a mess.”8 9 10

In Alabama, Marshae Jones was charged with the manslaughter of her fetus after being shot in the stomach; the woman who shot her was not charged.11 A gynecologist who was employed by the University of Southern California’s health center for 27 years and allowed to retire with a payout, despite hundreds of complaints of sexual assault and inappropriate comments, was arrested.12 13 Fatou Jallow, who once won Gambia’s top beauty pageant, publicly accused former President Yahya Jammeh, who presided over a death squad that allegedly gunned down migrants, of rape.14 It was reported that Col Allan, a longtime business partner of Rupert Murdoch, made the New York Post remove stories about E. Jean Carroll’s accusation that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in a Bergdorf Goodman fitting room in the 1990s, of which Trump said Carroll was “totally lying” because, “I’ll say it with great respect: number one, she’s not my type.”15 16 The Iranian president, Hassan Rouhani, called the White House “mentally retarded,” and Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to visit North Korea a few days after jokingly telling President Vladimir Putin and another Russian official, before a roomful of journalists, “Don’t meddle in the election.”17 18 19 “The liberal idea has become obsolete,” said Putin in an interview, and former special counsel Robert Mueller announced that he will testify before Congress on July 17.20 21 In Chicago, an employee of a cocktail bar spit on Eric Trump.22 His sister Ivanka, an unpaid adviser to the president who made at least $12 million in 2017, was one of two female speakers at the Special Event on Women’s Empowerment, a G20 talk that was attended by two female heads of state.22 23 “We believe that women’s inclusion in the economy is not solely a social justice issue, which of course it is. It’s also smart economic and defense policy,” she said. In Hawaii, 1,000 pieces of mail stolen 13 to 15 years ago were discovered in the storage unit of a deceased postal worker, and the state’s largest corruption case, which was precipitated by the attempt of Katherine Kealoha, the former deputy prosecutor, and her husband, Louis, the then chief of police in Honolulu, to frame Kealoha’s uncle for stealing their mailbox in 2013, concluded with convictions for the couple and two other police officers.24 25 26 Kealoha faces two additional federal trials.

Illinois legalized recreational marijuana, the city of San Francisco banned e-cigarettes, and the sale of La Croix became legal in Massachusetts.27 28 29 Parisian swimming pools have extended their hours into the evening to help residents during a continentwide heat wave that has resulted in record-high temperatures in France.30 31 Authorities in Spain arrested a Brazilian military officer traveling on President Jair Bolsonaro’s plane for possessing 86 pounds of cocaine, and in Westchester, California, a rat fell from the ceiling onto a table at a Buffalo Wild Wings.32 33 Boeing parked dozens of its 737 planes, the safety of which are currently under investigation, in the employee lot, and New York announced that there are, officially, 2,373 squirrels in Central Park.34 35 “It’s about who we are inside, isn’t it?” an interviewer asked the Dalai Lama after he said the next Dalai Lama should be “more attractive” if a woman. “Yes,” he replied. “I think both.”36Jacob Rosenberg

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