Biologists were hoping to use pheromones to control the boneless sea lamprey, a primitive fish with teeth on its tongue and along the edge of its mouth that attaches itself to the side of other fish and sucks out their juices until they die. | Harper's Magazine

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Biologists were hoping to use pheromones to control the boneless sea lamprey, a primitive fish with teeth on its tongue and along the edge of its mouth that attaches itself to the side of other fish and sucks out their juices until they die.

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Biologists were hoping to use pheromones to control the boneless sea lamprey, a primitive fish with teeth on its tongue and along the edge of its mouth that attaches itself to the side of other fish and sucks out their juices until they die.

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