Hawfinches (Coccothraustes coccothraustes), thrush nightingales (Luscinia luscinia), mistle thrushes (Turdus viscivorus), tree pipits (Anthus trivialis), black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros), common whitethroats (Sylvia communis), and wood warblers (Phylloscopus sibilatrix) were found to have adapted to the ionizing radiation of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. | Harper's Magazine

Sign in to access Harper’s Magazine

Need to create a login? Want to change your email address or password? Forgot your password?

  1. Sign in to Customer Care using your account number or postal address.
  2. Select Email/Password Information.
  3. Enter your new information and click on Save My Changes.

Locked out of your account? Get help here.

Subscribers can find additional help here.

Not a subscriber? Subscribe today!

Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.
Subscribe for Full Access
Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.

Hawfinches (Coccothraustes coccothraustes), thrush nightingales (Luscinia luscinia), mistle thrushes (Turdus viscivorus), tree pipits (Anthus trivialis), black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros), common whitethroats (Sylvia communis), and wood warblers (Phylloscopus sibilatrix) were found to have adapted to the ionizing radiation of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Adjust

Hawfinches (Coccothraustes coccothraustes), thrush nightingales (Luscinia luscinia), mistle thrushes (Turdus viscivorus), tree pipits (Anthus trivialis), black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros), common whitethroats (Sylvia communis), and wood warblers (Phylloscopus sibilatrix) were found to have adapted to the ionizing radiation of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

More from

More