In the Amazon, two-toed sloths, who usually visit the forest floor only once or twice a week (to defecate, and occasionally to switch trees), were descending at night to climb into the latrines of primatologists and eat handfuls of feces, toilet paper, and urine. Researchers who observed the behavior speculated that the participating sloths, among them a mother and her baby, may have been enticed by the promise of protein, salt, or larvae. The researchers (who had intended to study not sloths but red titi monkeys) also worried that these sloths might fall ill. | Harper's Magazine

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In the Amazon, two-toed sloths, who usually visit the forest floor only once or twice a week (to defecate, and occasionally to switch trees), were descending at night to climb into the latrines of primatologists and eat handfuls of feces, toilet paper, and urine. Researchers who observed the behavior speculated that the participating sloths, among them a mother and her baby, may have been enticed by the promise of protein, salt, or larvae. The researchers (who had intended to study not sloths but red titi monkeys) also worried that these sloths might fall ill.

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In the Amazon, two-toed sloths, who usually visit the forest floor only once or twice a week (to defecate, and occasionally to switch trees), were descending at night to climb into the latrines of primatologists and eat handfuls of feces, toilet paper, and urine. Researchers who observed the behavior speculated that the participating sloths, among them a mother and her baby, may have been enticed by the promise of protein, salt, or larvae. The researchers (who had intended to study not sloths but red titi monkeys) also worried that these sloths might fall ill.

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