Researchers at Emory University announced that they had used gene therapy to create high levels of vasopressin receptors in the ventral forebrains of promiscuous male meadow voles, and that within days the voles settled down into nice monogamous relationships, just like their cousins the prairie voles, which naturally have high numbers of vasopressin receptors and mate for life. Monkeys exhibit similar behavior patterns and brain chemistry, though experts warned that a cure for human promiscuity was unlikely. | Harper's Magazine

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Researchers at Emory University announced that they had used gene therapy to create high levels of vasopressin receptors in the ventral forebrains of promiscuous male meadow voles, and that within days the voles settled down into nice monogamous relationships, just like their cousins the prairie voles, which naturally have high numbers of vasopressin receptors and mate for life. Monkeys exhibit similar behavior patterns and brain chemistry, though experts warned that a cure for human promiscuity was unlikely.

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Researchers at Emory University announced that they had used gene therapy to create high levels of vasopressin receptors in the ventral forebrains of promiscuous male meadow voles, and that within days the voles settled down into nice monogamous relationships, just like their cousins the prairie voles, which naturally have high numbers of vasopressin receptors and mate for life. Monkeys exhibit similar behavior patterns and brain chemistry, though experts warned that a cure for human promiscuity was unlikely.

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