Scientists at the University of Kansas theorized that the Ordovician extinction, which occurred 450 million years ago, could have been caused by a gamma-ray burst that weakened Earth's ozone layer. They said that a large burst lasting as little as ten seconds could strip away half the ozone layer, which would leave plants and animals unprotected from the sun's ultraviolet radiation. | Harper's Magazine

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Scientists at the University of Kansas theorized that the Ordovician extinction, which occurred 450 million years ago, could have been caused by a gamma-ray burst that weakened Earth’s ozone layer. They said that a large burst lasting as little as ten seconds could strip away half the ozone layer, which would leave plants and animals unprotected from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.

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Scientists at the University of Kansas theorized that the Ordovician extinction, which occurred 450 million years ago, could have been caused by a gamma-ray burst that weakened Earth’s ozone layer. They said that a large burst lasting as little as ten seconds could strip away half the ozone layer, which would leave plants and animals unprotected from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.

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