Scientists discovered that mice, rabbits, rats, beagles, geese, and other animals used in laboratories strongly dislike even relatively benign experiments and become genuinely terrified when they are handled by vivisectionists, when blood is taken from their bodies, or when tubes are inserted into their stomachs. Such daily routines of laboratory life produce elevated concentrations of corticosterone, prolactin, glucose, and epinephrine, all of which are signs of extreme stress, and it was pointed out that such stress reactions can seriously compromise the results of research on tumor development, immune function, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders. | Harper's Magazine

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Scientists discovered that mice, rabbits, rats, beagles, geese, and other animals used in laboratories strongly dislike even relatively benign experiments and become genuinely terrified when they are handled by vivisectionists, when blood is taken from their bodies, or when tubes are inserted into their stomachs. Such daily routines of laboratory life produce elevated concentrations of corticosterone, prolactin, glucose, and epinephrine, all of which are signs of extreme stress, and it was pointed out that such stress reactions can seriously compromise the results of research on tumor development, immune function, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders.

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Scientists discovered that mice, rabbits, rats, beagles, geese, and other animals used in laboratories strongly dislike even relatively benign experiments and become genuinely terrified when they are handled by vivisectionists, when blood is taken from their bodies, or when tubes are inserted into their stomachs. Such daily routines of laboratory life produce elevated concentrations of corticosterone, prolactin, glucose, and epinephrine, all of which are signs of extreme stress, and it was pointed out that such stress reactions can seriously compromise the results of research on tumor development, immune function, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders.

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