South Korean scientists created thirty human clone embryos and harvested embryonic stem cells from one of them; the stem cells were then injected into mice, where they formed cartilage, muscle, bone, and other tissues. The research received wide praise from experts in the field, but it was noted that the techniques used for such therapeutic cloning will now be available for human reproduction. | Harper's Magazine

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South Korean scientists created thirty human clone embryos and harvested embryonic stem cells from one of them; the stem cells were then injected into mice, where they formed cartilage, muscle, bone, and other tissues. The research received wide praise from experts in the field, but it was noted that the techniques used for such therapeutic cloning will now be available for human reproduction.

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South Korean scientists created thirty human clone embryos and harvested embryonic stem cells from one of them; the stem cells were then injected into mice, where they formed cartilage, muscle, bone, and other tissues. The research received wide praise from experts in the field, but it was noted that the techniques used for such therapeutic cloning will now be available for human reproduction.

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